Xojo Cloud Database Support

Last week Xojo announced new features for Xojo Cloud.  They now support MySQL and PostgreSQL database servers in addition to SQLite that they have supported since day one.  One of the interesting features with the database support is that db admin tools that support SSL tunnels can connect to the database as if it was running locally.  In my testing it was surprisingly easy to setup and use.

The first thing to do is log into your Xojo Cloud account control panel.  Then simply enable either the MySQL or PostgreSQL database and enable the SSL Tunnel.  In each case you will receive a username and password that you’ll need to copy before moving on to the next step.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 10.28.25 AM

Our MySQL admin tool of choice is NaviCat.  Setting it up was pretty easy to do.  Create a new connection and then navigate to the SSH tab.  Enter your server IP address, the username and password.

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Then navigate to the General tab and enter a Name for this connection (I used Xojo Cloud).  Because you’re using the SSL Tunnel you need to enter ‘localhost’ into the Host field.  Enter your Xojo supplied username and password and then test your connection.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 10.38.00 AM

After that, everything acts just as if the server were local to you.  In this example I created a sample database named ‘bkeeney’ and a table called ’t_temp’.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 10.34.09 AM

Your Xojo web application, then, will connect to it via the localhost parameter along with username and password suppled to you from Xojo.  Because it’s inside the firewall your web app needs to do nothing more.

Setting up a database server in Xojo Cloud really is that simple.  It just works.  From start to finish it only takes a few minutes to get up and running.  It’s a great addition to Xojo Cloud.

XojoTalk

One of the things that I love about the Xojo community is that it’s pretty friendly group.  You ask a question on the forums and you’ll usually get a decent answer or two.  This means that we’ve often ‘talked’ with Xojo experts but have never met them.  One of the things that stinks about the Xojo community is that we are a small enough group that it’s likely there are not a lot of Xojo developers near you.  That’s a shame because the Xojo developers I’ve met in person are as nice, if not nicer, than they were online.

If you can possibly attend the Xojo Developers Conference (this year it’s April 29 – May 1 in Austin, Texas) I highly recommend it.  Whether you are a newbie to Xojo or been around the block, as they say, a few times, I’ve always found it to be a good experience.  To be able to talk Xojo for 3 or 4 days is invaluable!  Nowhere on the planet will you find a higher concentration of Xojo developers per square foot.

Recently Paul Lefebvre, the Xojo Evangelist from Xojo, has been hosting a podcast called XojoTalk.  I love these podcasts because we get to hear from Xojo developers that we’ve ‘known’ for years through the forums and we get to learn a bit about them.  How they came to use Xojo and what they’re doing with Xojo.

Often the conversations veer off into some strange topic that you wouldn’t expect.  When I was a guest back in October the Royals were starting their playoff runs and while I’m not much a baseball fan it was a BIG deal for those of us in the Kansas City region (29 years since our last playoff appearance).  We also talked a bit about the, then, recently announced Windows 10 and what it meant for Xojo developers.  These organic conversations are entertaining and well worth a listen.  Paul does a great job so check it out!

You can subscribe to the podcast via your favorite RSS reader via http://feeds.feedburner.com/xojotalk or via iTunes at https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/xojotalk-podcast/id920411434

My entire team will be at XDC.  We are doing only two sessions this year.  Carol is doing a database design session and I’m doing a reporting tools session.  Hope to see you there!

Xojo Trainer Feb 2015 Update

We released an update to Xojo Trainer today.  We’ve added over 8 additional hours of Xojo Training video to our package.  This brings the total up to over 60 hours!  Here’s the complete list of new video topics:

iOS

  • iOS Walkthrough
  • 1.0 iOS App Object
  • 2.0 iOS App Icon and Launch Images
  • 3.0 iOSScreens and iOSViews
  • 4.0 iOSTextField and iOSTextArea
  • 5.0 iOSButton and iOSMessageDialog
  • 6.0 iOSCanvas
  • 7.0 iOSHTMLViewer
  • 8.0 iOSImageViewer
  • 9.0 iOS Primitive objects
  • 10.0 iOSLabel
  • 11.0 iOSSlider
  • 12.0 iOSSwitch
  • 13.0 Xojo.Core.Tiemr
  • 14.0 iOSSegmentedControl
  • 15.0 iOSTable
  • 16.0 Xojo.Net.TCPSocket

New Framework

  • 1.0 Xojo.Core.Date
  • 2.0 Xojo.Core.Dictionary

Web Edition

  • PictureShare project

These are the same videos that we’ve been streaming to thousands of Xojo developers for years at http://xojo.bkeeney.com/XojoTraining/.  Now you can view these videos and get the source code that comes with them offline at any time on your Mac or Windows computer.

We recently hit a milestone on our online Xojo Training – we’ve now streamed over 9,000 hours of video to users all over the world.  All of this via a Xojo web app!

For more information on Xojo Trainer, please visit http://www.bkeeney.com/allproducts/xojo-trainer/

Xojo 2015 Release 1

This week saw the release of Xojo 2015 Release 1.  This release has only a couple of new features (and one really big change) but many smaller changes and bug fixes.

The biggest new feature for Xojo is that you can now build 64 bit iOS applications.  This is a big deal because Apple is making 64 bit iOS apps mandatory for those apps submitted to the App Store.  As of February 1st submissions to the App Store must be universal 32 bit / 64 bit app bundles.

In December 2014 Xojo gave us a tentative roadmap and met it as 2015 R1 was in a usable beta on February 1st.  This is an accomplishment in and of itself since Xojo rarely, if ever, gives us their schedule.  Not only gave a schedule but met it!  I’d say lets give them some kudos for being a bit more open and accomplishing their task!

So far in testing it appears that 64 bit iOS applications are solid.  This also means that the 64 bit compiler is working and works in a 32 bit application and debugger.  According to their December 2014 blog post the next up for the 64 bit treatment is Linux web/console and this will be much anticipated by anyone that’s tried to install a Linux web app on a 64 bit Linux OS and struggled to find 32 bit compatibility libraries.

Besides 64 bit for iOS, there are a plethora of bug fixes to the IDE, the new framework, and the compiler.  To say that the IDE received some love would be an understatement.  These changes should make for a more stable development environment.  The number of bug fixes is too many to list here and I highly recommend reading the release notes.

The IDE Icon Editor received another makeover (how many is this in the past 15 years?) that allows it to handle 1024 by 1024 icons.  Some unused sizes were removed and the output format is now PNG rather than JPEG2000.  In my own testing it seemed that images moved forward from older projects didn’t look quite right so you should definitely make sure your icon images are updated before doing a release.

The Web framework received a few important updates.  WebLabels now work properly on dynamically created WebContainers.  WebCheckboxes respond properly on touch devices.  WebContainer mouse event handlers no longer interfere with scrolling.  WebListbox no longer offsets the selection if placed inside a WebContainer and accessed from a touch device.  Internet Explorer now supports gradient fills.

The new framework received new Parse functions for Integer, Double, Single and will act like the existing framework Val and CDbl functions.  What this means, in reality, is that Parse is more lenient and doesn’t throw exceptions when it can’t figure out the value of the passed in Text.  I think it’s obvious that Xojo is mindful of how we are using the new framework and reacting to our (valid) criticisms and wants and needs.

Windows and Linux users didn’t receive much love in this release, however.  The release notes only have a few for each and those seem pretty minor.  One bug fix that affects everyone, but appears to affect Windows more, was the Serial control.  It appears that it was possible to receive incorrect data.

I think many will be happy with this release.  64 bit iOS applications were a necessity and everything else was bug fixes and expansions of functionality.  I wish more releases were like this (i.e. a few new features and mostly bug fixes).

As with any new release you’ll need to test it against your own projects to find out if you have any issues.

What are your comments about Xojo 2015 Release 1?

Xojo Open Source Projects

In my last post I talked about the state of the 3rd party market for Xojo.  It was a somewhat depressing talk for those already selling and a cautionary tale for those contemplating entering the market.  All is not bad news, however.  In some ways, the amount of open source source code available for Xojo is at an all-time high.

For many Xojo developers the must-have libraries are the Windows Functionality Suite  and MacOSLib .  These two libraries are great places to start to enhance your Windows and Macintosh applications respectively.  There are both free and wrap system API calls into Xojo classes and methods.  I would start with these two classes.

The folks at IntelligentVisibility have done some interesting things.  Their CalendarTimeChooser project is 100% Xojo code calendar and time chooser that is pretty slick, in my opinion.  Besides that they have a DropBoxAPI project, a Telnet class for Xojo, a Logging class, an AutoCompleteTextField, and a Loading Wheel control.

Long time Xojo user Kem Tekinay has released Kaju.  Kaju is a set of classes that can perform self-updates for your Mac, Windows, and Linux apps.  This solves some real world problems we all face and while Monkeybread Software has the Updater Toolkit it uses different technique for each platform and (from experience) troubleshooting can be difficult in getting the Sparkle framework working on the Mac.

Another long time user, Scott Boss, of Nocturnal Coding Monkeys, has released the Xojo Colors Module that aims to simplify the use of colors in your Xojo project.  Another project is XoDrill which is Xojo class that uses the Mandril APIs from MailChimp allowing you to send mass mailing through the MailChimp service.

iOS has only been out for one release, but it has received a lot of love from the community.  Some criticize Xojo for not being complete and not providing some basic functionality.  I disagree because Xojo should not have to provide everything – just the basics for us to do everything else.  I think it’s working because the work coming out of the community has been extraordinary.  If your Xojo iOS app needs gestures then xojoGestures is a great place to start.

If you are working with iOS then I hope you are spending a lot of time in the Xojo iOS forum.  The users there are turning out iOS declares at a prodigious rate and there are way too many to list here.  The forum should be your first place to search for a solution.

Xojo for iOS has introduced the new framework which, in come cases, is considerably different than the existing one.  XojoiOSWrapper  tries to bring those legacy framework methods to the new framework and specifically for iOS.  If you’re working with iOS AND desktop apps and trying to use a set of shared business logic between them you’re finding it hard to accomplish.  GlueKit for Xojo is a set of classes and methods from long time Xojo developer Phillip Zedalis of 1701 Software, that allows you to interact with a single class that bridges the new and old frameworks.

Perhaps this trend is part of a larger trend with software that tends to make things open source.  I’m still not convinced that this is the best thing, long term, but it does provide some stability with developers entering and leaving the community and having source disappear forever.  Regardless of the long term implications it shows that the Xojo community is alive and thriving.

If I didn’t catch your Xojo open source project I apologize profusely!  Any oversights are purely my error.  Please leave a comment with the link to your repository and a brief description of what it does.  And for those of you wiling to share your work with the community a big hearty THANK YOU!

Shorts 1.1

picAppIcon256We released a new version of BKeeney Shorts today.  Version 1.1 is a recommended update for all registered users and is a free update.

Version 1.1 has a number of improvements:

• Text blocks now have an AutoHeightAdjust property that lets them auto wrap their text and change the text height accordingly

• New demo report that demonstrates the automatic height adjustment in a row (i.e. GroupItem) of data of varying text

• The desktop version now has an RTF Block and uses the Formatted Text Control to convert into Shorts reports and HTML

• The Demo project for Web and Desktop comes with viewers you can use in your own projects

• Multiple demo reports with the various ways to create a report via code

More information on pricing, features, documentation, demo project, and more available at http://www.bkeeney.com/allproducts/bkeeney-shorts/

The State of the Xojo 3rd Party Developer Market [u]

BKeeney Software offers a variety of Xojo developer tools for sale. BKeeney Shorts is a reporting tool unlike anything else in the Xojo kingdom and allows you complete control over your reports. That is its strength and also its weakness since you have to fully code your report. We also offer a Calendar class for use in desktop applications, a cross platform Spell Checker plugin, and ARGen that creates the classes that ActiveRecord uses to make database coding easier and quicker in Xojo.

Over the years we were approached by developers that were leaving the Xojo market and wanted a home for their product. When True North Software decided to exit the Xojo market we purchased the rights to Formatted Text Control, RB Code Reports and a number of other Xojo related tools. When Pandaware left we picked up Simple Help Editor and Styled HTML Field. Many people were asking for PDF classes and had fond memories of Fireye Software’s PDF classes so we tracked down Asher and acquired those too.

We purchased these products from their respective owners either because we already owned the products or had a use for them. In some cases we simply updated the source code and in some cases we started a complete rewrite to suit our needs. This means that in addition to the original thousands of man-hours the original developers used to create them we’ve invested significant time and effort ourselves to work on them.

BKeeney Software can’t exist on the sales of these developer products. Developer product sales are lucky if they top 20% of our annual income. Most years it’s less than that. Our second highest income earner is our Xojo Training material but, by far, our best income source is our consulting services. With multiple Xojo developers that makes sense. Not only can we throw all of our developers on a project we can (and usually do) all work on separate projects. When one of us is idle (which thankfully isn’t very often) we find time to work on our applications and developer products (and me on training material).

I was on the receiving end of a grievance on the forums this week where I was accused of not delivering updates that I promised on one of the products. If I did nothing but work on our products I’d be out of business in short order and that product would just go away and who knows if anyone would pick them up.

This got me thinking. Am I unique in this position? So I queried some other Xojo developers to find out what the state of the Xojo 3rd party market is like and if they would share their thoughts. I received more information back than I expected.

Almost all of the developers I contacted said that product sales were a minor portion of their income with most stating it was less than 20% of their income. Jérémie Leroy has a full-time job and the Xojo business is just a happy sideline. Sam Rowlands said there was no way the sales of his developer products comes close to paying for itself. And,one of the more well known figures in the Xojo community, Christian Schmitz said, “Even with the scale I have with MBS myself. Consulting keeps the company running.”

From these statements, it’s pretty obvious that the 3rd party market, while not exactly stagnant, isn’t thriving either. Everyone I talked to has other sources of income besides their developer tool/utility sales. Part of this is probably because the Xojo market is small. Another reason might be the hobbyists that Xojo attracts and they simply don’t have the means to purchase tools. Another possibility is that Xojo has ‘good enough’ tools built-in and newcomers don’t need the more advanced commercial, add-ons.

One of the interesting comments I received from several developers was that it was those that purchased the cheapest version of their products (some offer encrypted and non-encrypted versions) created the most work for them. I’ve seen this myself with our encrypted source code that it seems to generate more support tickets than the full-source versions. Based on this feedback I am seriously considering removing the encrypted versions from our store and simply selling the full-source versions. It’s interesting that our one product that doesn’t have encryption (Formatted Text Control) doesn’t generate that much support help despite it being one of the largest and most complicated products we sell.

All of the developers I contacted felt that the future of Xojo is bright and holds promise. iOS development in Xojo might become as big as desktop and web which means new customers for their products. The new framework causes concern for many in the Xojo community but the developers I talked to were ecstatic that Xojo was listening to our concerns and making incremental changes to the new framework based on that feedback.

The 3rd party Xojo development tool market is tough business to make a living at. The fact that half our products came from developers leaving the community says something. That some of the most well known and respected voices in the community can’t make a living selling Xojo developer tools and have other sources of income is also telling.

So what can Xojo do to help us out? Growing the user base is the biggest thing they can do and it seems that having the iOS version is a step in growing the platform. One area of concern, though, is that many Windows users are unhappy with Xojo right now. They feel, rightly or wrongly is besides the point, that the focus has been so Apple and iOS oriented the past couple of years that they feel unwelcome. Some focus on making the Windows experience better would be reassuring to them.

I also think that Xojo could do more to promote the 3rd party products. Perhaps the Xojo Developer Evangelist could pick a product to review each month. Xojo Developer Magazine does reviews like this but it doesn’t receive the eyeballs that the official Xojo site gets. Personally I’d offer a discount for the people that purchase via the review. The market isn’t THAT big and it would be a good way to show off some products and generate sales for developers that are starving for income. More income means more of time for product development and everyone wins when that happens.

I feel the future is good. More Xojo users means more product sales (hopefully). This, in turn, means we can spend more time on those products and pump out updates on a regular basis. Until then, us 3rd party Xojo developers will continue with our labors of love and put updates out when we can.

What do you think of the 3rd party market? What could Xojo do to improve it?

[Update:  ]

After looking at our 2014 numbers our total developer products and training sales was LESS THAN 10% of our total income.  In 2013 the amount was more but amounted to less than 5% of our annual income (consulting was VERY good that year).  In other words, if we relied on our developer products and training to make a living we would quickly go out of business.

Seriously, why do I even bother with developer sales?  Just using them and updating them for ourselves would be cheaper in the long run.

Client Red Flags

I’ve talked before about those little things that prospective clients (and sometimes actual clients) do that should give you cause for concern.  These are those things that should be red flags and make you reconsider taking them as a client, or not keeping them as a client.  We recently took on a new client that had already burned through another Xojo developer before coming to us.

I’ll start off by saying that we have an entire stable of clients that came to us after they had tried out another developer.  Roughly 75% of our long term clients have come to us this way.  For some, the developer left the industry and recommend us to their client but for some the Xojo consultants had failed to deliver a working application even after quite a bit of time and money.  The clients came to us and they’re happy that we have multiple developers and have a breadth of experience that is hard to find elsewhere.  We’re also not going away anytime soon.

This client should have raised enough red flags for us to avoid from the start.  But, honestly, that’s easy to say in retrospect.  Sometimes you just won’t know until you work with them for weeks and sometimes months.  Plus, it was a smallish project that was only a couple of weeks long.  What could go wrong, right?

The clients first developer underbid us by a grand total of 10 hours but had significantly lower billing rate.  A couple of months later the client parted ways due to lack of progress from the first developer and called us back.  Red flag number one, in my opinion.  Clients have every right to be price conscious but one warning sign is if they’re trying to get the project done ‘cheap’ and ‘quick’.  While possible they also need to be flexible and this client was anything but.

The second issue with the client is that they kept using phrases “we want it exactly like this,” with ‘this’ being a VB6 application that looked like they coded it in 1995 and an HTML website that harkened back to the 90’s as well.  Even if Xojo could create such an application (it can’t without significant work) I’m not sure I would simply because creating a 20 year old GUI isn’t something I strive for.  We were going to create modern GUI (nothing crazy – just want Xojo gives us) with a database backend so the application could scale.  But they demanded flat files and a UI that looked ‘exactly’ like their prototype (which was non-functional).  Their reasoning?  Because they understood it and ‘their generation’ understands that look.  Hm…okay.

I guess my biggest issue with this client is they chose Xojo – not us.  There was nothing in the project spec (a VB6 app, a simple HTML web site, and some phone meetings) that said it couldn’t be done in Xojo and when we heard ‘just like this’ we translated this to mean ‘as close to this in Xojo as possible’ and when we didn’t make it look like the 90’s website they were mad and cancelled the contract despite us redesigning the app twice in attempt to mollify them.

In retrospect, the client doesn’t really want a Xojo developer.  They want an HTML and php developer that will do exactly what they want.  No more.  No less.  The signs were there from the beginning – we just failed to see it.

In the long run it’s just another red flag example that I hope to learn from and I hope that you don’t have to go through either.

Are You Still Using Real Studio?

Xojo has been out for about a year and half now.  Based on comments in the forums and on this blog I’ve come to the conclusion that a fair number of people are still using Real Studio.

For some it might be the Navigator.  For some it might be supporting older operating systems that Xojo doesn’t support.  I am curious on what your reasons are for sticking with Real Studio and not going with Xojo.

Thanks for the comments!

Xojo.Core.Date

I ran across an issue with Xojo.Core.Date that I talked about on the forums https://forum.xojo.com/18549-xojo-core-date-question.

The issue is that the new Date class does not have SQLDateTime.  Well, technically it does with a generic ToText function.  However, there is no way to get just the SQLDate portion without having to write your own method.

The ToText method has a LOT of power to do and it is considerably more powerful than the old Date class.  The ability to work with Locale is very cool and should simplify some things.  However, I have some issues with the ‘replacement’ for SQLDateTime.

First, SQLDateTime is very explicit in what it does.  ToText (with no parameters) doesn’t tell me jack and the fact that I missed it in the documentation tells me the name absolutely 100% fails the ‘name explicitly tells you what it does’ test.

Second, there’s no option to just get the Date in SQL format.  Sure, you can create your own method to get that but that’s one more thing to create, test, and maintain.  There are times when you need just the SQLdate portion.  It doesn’t matter why we need it – we need it.

The new Date class is full of wonderful things.  However, removing functionality that many of us use every day should be avoided.  I think this is one of those times where the Xojo engineers got too clever in the new framework.  I’d much rather have the SQLDateTime and SQLDate methods back.  They are much more explicit than ToText.  If you agree, you can sign on to <feedback://showreport?report_id=37521>

Of course, like with the Numeric.FromText methods, I’m willing to be convinced that the Date.ToText method to get SQLDateTime is better.  What say you?

 

[Update]

Later I realized that we could accomplish everything by adding the SQL option to the DateFormat and Locale enumerations.  Then the code would be something like this:



dim d as Xojo.Core.Date = Xojo.Core.Date.Now

dim t as text = d.ToText(Locale.None, Date.FormatStyles.SQL, Date.FormatStyles.SQL)


That would solve all of the issues, no?  They get to keep ToText and we get the ability to format the date in whatever form we want.  Then there is no ToText without Parameters.