Xojo 2017 Release 1

The road to 64-bit took another step forward today with the release of Xojo 2017 R1.  This important release let’s you do 64-bit Remote Debugging for some targets with some important caveats.  It also adds the ability to Remote Debug Raspberry Pi applications.  And, as with every Xojo release there are a mix of new features and important bug fixes.

64-bit Remote Debugging

2017 R1 lets you remote debug 64 desktop, console, and web applications on macOS and Linux assuming that neither one uses XojoScript.  64-bit XojoScript is still missing in action which is preventing the IDE itself from being 64-bit.  I believe this is scheduled for Release 2.

Missing is the ability to remote debug 64-bit iOS, and 64-bit Windows applications.  Presumably iOS shouldn’t take long since macOS is already working.  From what I gather the LLVM compiler for Windows isn’t as far along as macOS and Linux so it’s taking longer to get working.

The Remote Debugger Stub has been updated to version 2.1 and now has 32-bit and 64-bit versions for Mac, Windows, and Linux, and a Linux ARM version for the Raspberry Pi.  The 64-bit version can switch between 32-bit and 64-bit correctly depending on the target setting in the IDE.

Major Changes

One of the important updates to the web framework is causing major issues with HTMLViewer controls that depend on StatusChanged events.  The web standards group decided that the StatusChanged can no longer be fired via javascript any more and the updated WebKit engine in R1 breaks code that depended on the old functionality.  For developers using Tim Parnel’s HTML Edit you will have to wait for an update before upgrading to R1.

The web framework now allows developers to use HTML in many of the controls.  WebLabel, RadioGroup, Listbox, Toolbar items, and SegmentedControl can use HTML tags in their captions.  Example:  Label1.Text = “This is a line with <raw><b>bold</b></raw> text in it.”

The Listbox has been updated for all desktop targets and now allows you to customize the disclosure widget.  This seems like an odd change.  Could this be prep work for something in a future release?

SSLv3 on Xojo Cloud services is deprecated and will be disabled on all servers in summer of 2017.

One of the new options in the Preferences is to force Standardized Format after every line.  This mirrors the contextual menu command Standardize Format which looks at the current selection and changes the case of every Xojo keyword to match it’s default.  So if you typed ‘recordset’ it will change the case to ‘RecordSet’.  It does nothing for your own variables (which would be more useful, in my opinion, and it looks like a future release may allow for that).

Also new in the preferences is the ability to change the keyboard shortcuts of all of the menus in Xojo.  If you don’t like the Remote Debugging key combination you can change it to something else.  One that I think I will change is the Build (command/control B) to something (perhaps command-option-B) since I often accidentally build once or twice a week when simply trying to paste code.

Bug Fixes

A number of Windows framework bugs were fixed.  Probably one of the more important ones is with Xojo.Net.HTTPSocket.  The socket events are now called when it is created within a thread.

Another big Windows bug fix is in Direct2D printing (broken in 2016 R4).  Font sizes were incorrectly reported by the graphics object and thus caused all printing to be messed up.  BKS Shorts (our reporting tool for Xojo) works properly in 2017 R1 when printing in Windows.

Windows received a number of important HiDPI updates.  Note that the application icon for 64-bit builds is still not being set.  One workaround is to set the associated icon via your installer.  If you want an example of how to set this via an Innosetup script, let me know and I’ll share it with you.

The IDE received a really big batch of bug fixes in R1.  The amount of them makes it impossible to list them all here, but one that’s been around for a long time is that ellipses (…) are no longer saved when creating the method signature.  That bug hits me every now and then.  For the entire list of IDE bug fixes, please see the release notes.

Conclusions

The road to full 64-bit compatibility is happening incrementally.  R1 is another step in the journey and it’s nice to see progress.  It is my hope that 2017 R2 will have Windows and iOS 64-bit remote debugging (in the iOS Simulator – I doubt remote debugging on an actual iOS device will ever happen).

Xojo has said that the Windows IDE will require 64-bit at some point in the future (even though it will still be able to build 32-bit Windows apps) and that future might be sooner than we expect.  I’m curious on how many people think this is a good or bad?

This release has some nice goodies in it.  The remote debugging for the Raspberry Pi has been awesome.  I’m working on a project right now that advanced in a number of days what had taken me months of work to do before.  The work in Windows to correct the Direct2D printing issues is most welcome and the number of HiDPI fixes is nice too.

I’ve been using R1 in regular production work for a number of weeks for macOS, Windows, Raspberry Pi, and iOS development and I’ve been pretty happy with it.  It’s been stable and I have no complaints with it.  The only thing I didn’t spend any time on in this release cycle was web.

Anything new in 2017 R1 that you are happy about?  Anything that disappointed you?

Grateful for the Xojo IDE

I use Xojo every day and it’s almost my exclusive development tool.  I’m so close to the product it is easy to see the warts of the product but in reality it’s a pretty stable and easy-to-use system that’s mostly good for beginners and experts alike.  The documentation, while not perfect is useful and the example projects are decent as well.

I came to this conclusion after a couple of recent projects have taken me into xCode and Eclipse.  Where to even begin comparing these IDEs to Xojo is challenging because they are both similar and so different than Xojo.  In xCode I was porting some iOS Objective-C code to Xojo and working with a hardware library.  Eclipse is used by my son’s FRC robotics team to develop software for their robot.  In each case I’ve wanted to pull (what’s left of) my hair out.

I guess one of the biggest differences is that sheer number of options you have in both xCode and Eclipse.  So many options, I posit, that it’s difficult to figure out what they all do, and make it hard for beginners (like I was a few weeks ago) to get going.  I don’t make any claims in knowing them any better now than I did a few weeks ago either.  I got them to work and I simply left them in that state with the hopes that no future update wipes them out.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m still not the biggest fan of the Xojo IDE in comparison to the old Real Studio IDE.  This is mainly because of the Navigator and how spastic it’s been since it’s initial release.  Thankfully it’s working pretty well in the latest releases and I find myself not swearing at the IDE much.

I also know the plan is to make the Navigator work closer to the old project tab in Real Studio.  Truthfully, I’m looking forward to it and dreading it at the same time.  I *think* it will work better than the current system but I won’t know until I use it.  And by the time we use it, it will already be too late to make any significant changes.  I dread that we’ll be faced with some awful bugs that will take time to work out and I also dread that the workflow might actually be worse than it is now.  We just won’t know until it’s put in front of us.

Are there other things that I wish the Xojo IDE did differently?  Sure.  I despise defining methods in the tiny Inspector whereas in the Real Studio IDE it took up the entire width of the Code Editor.  I also wish there were faster ways to define methods since I’m forced to use the UI to do so.  You figure after 15 years of doing this I pretty much know how to do it by now.  Alas, I have no other option than to use the UI.

Some of the other editors are like this too.  The Constants Editor requires too many mouse clicks to work right.  I want more “hands off the mouse” options.  As far as I can tell, the Menu Editor has no keyboard shortcuts as well as FileTypes editor.  In both cases, I would almost prefer a Plist type editor.

From a simplicity standpoint, though, Xojo is easy to use and doesn’t let you do too many stupid things.  I wish some other IDEs would take that approach for newbies, but then I guess their approach is to throw people into the deep end and let them sink or swim.  Xojo  tries to be helpful in that regard.

Other IDEs have some cool features.  What features would you like to see copied from other IDEs into Xojo?

Remote Debugging Enhancement Idea

Remote Debugging in Xojo is perhaps one of my favorite features in Xojo because it lets me work in the environment of my choice (macOS) and run it on any Windows, Linux, or even another Mac on my network, or in my many VM environments.  One of the things that’s always bugged me about remote debugging is the cycle time.  Every time you do a remote debug the IDE sends everything (executable, libraries, resources), again, to the remote debugger.  Even a simple change requires that the entire package is transferred to the remote debugger.  Every.  Single.  Time.

Xojo improved the cycle time for deploying web apps to Xojo Cloud in 2016 Release 4.  They did this by caching the framework and plugin libraries on the Xojo Cloud server.  When connecting to the Xojo Cloud server it tells the IDE what frameworks and plugin libraries it has and the IDE then decides what to upload.  So your first upload may take four or five minutes but subsequent uploads using the same version of Xojo take considerably less time.  In my case it’s about a minute.  It’s a welcome speed up.

In remote debugging, large projects can often take a LONG time to send simply due to their size.  I find myself debating on whether to install the IDE in that environment (along with prerequisite plugins), or to simply wait through the remote debug cycle.  Sometimes it’s a wash, but, I’ll be honest, it’s irritating to spend the three minutes transmitting to the remote debugger only to have to quit almost right away and change a label or a single line of code, only to have to sit through the transmit time again.

Why can’t they do the same thing for Remote Debugging that they did for deploying to Xojo Cloud?  Think of the time savings this change could do for someone that does a LOT of remote debugging like I do!

Time savings aside, there ARE some drawbacks.  The first is that the Remote Debugger becomes a much more complicated mechanism than it already is.  Since much of the code is (presumably) portable from Xojo Cloud to the Remote Debugger this might be a moot issue.  However, converting from whatever they’re using on Xojo Cloud (presumably Xojo) to desktop use may not be trivial.  It’s hard to say without asking that question.

Secondly, it would have to store all of these libraries and frameworks in a cache and then what would you do for cleanup?  When it quits delete these caches or keep them around?  I could argue for both ways.  Perhaps that’s a preference setting with maybe a quick calculation on how large the current cache is?

Third, it distracts from 64-bit Remote Debugging.  Maybe.  If I had the choice I’d love both, but if it meant delaying 64-bit for six months I’d rather have 64-bit now.  This is a wish list item, after all.

I created Feedback ID 46848 to get this idea into circulation.

What do you think about this idea, Xojo Developers?  What other pain points do you have with Remote Debugging?

Consulting Red Flags

The one absolute truth about consulting is that if you’re not working you’re not making any money.  The corollary to this truth is that you are either 100% busy or 100% not busy.  This is especially true if you are a solo developer.  It is very hard to turn down projects when they come your way but I’ve found that there are times when you should.

I get it.  Really, I do.  If you’ve been idle for longer than you’d like and money is starting to get tight ALL projects start to look good.  Don’t take the project because you need the money.  Take the project because it’s a good fit, it’s interesting work, and you think the client will be a good partner.

In the world of make-believe this is the way it should be.  In the real-world you don’t always have those options.  Plus, it’s really hard to figure out if a project is going to be a good one or not.  Here are some of the red flags I’ve come to recognize in fifteen years of being a Xojo consultant.

Other Peoples Code (OPC).  Code written by someone else is always a red flag.  We write code a certain way and if any of our team work on it we can rest assured that certain things will be done (naming conventions, comments, etc.).  No such guaranty with OPC.  It’s way easier to start from scratch but with most OPC projects you don’t have that option.  So you start with a level of uncertainty and having to decipher not only the coding style but often times the intent of another developer.  Learning someone elses code stinks.

Project complexity.  When I’m asked to join an existing project I try to look at how complex it is.  If it’s really complex I hesitate because I know it will never get less complex.  In many cases the original developer tried to be clever to solve some (real or imaginary) problem and while solving it completely overlooked a much simpler way of doing things.  Plus, if it’s not one of your core competencies it might not be a good fit anyway.

Another item under the project complexity red flag is excessive amounts of documentation.  From experience, most projects can be summed up with a page or two of high level description and then a dozen pages of important detail.  When the client sends you a very long document with high levels of detail you might be getting yourself in other your head.

Of course the flip side of that is clients that send you a paragraph or two of their idea.  In those cases we have to draw more information out of them, and depending upon the size of the project, we might actually charge them to write their specifications for them and let them get some competitive bids from other developers.  I think the lack of detail says they haven’t done enough homework on what they want and need.

Toxic teams.  Another issue with joining an existing project is trying to figure out if the team is toxic or not.  The existing developers will always have their own habits and you, as the consultant, need to try and match theirs.  What if those habits are silly?  I’ve seen teams that require a comment for every line of code.  I’ve seen some teams that disdain any comments under the guise that code should be ‘self commenting’.  Is there a team member who’s the ‘smartest person in the room’ and everyone else has to put up with it?

Project savior.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked to look at a project started by other developers and the project owner is desperate for it to get done.  In these cases they’ve spent a LOT of money with a developer and gotten poor, or no, results.  You have to ask yourself a few questions.  Was it the developer being incompetent, the owner being unreasonable, or both?  If you take one of these projects you can either be the hero by completing the project, or you can be the goat for being just as incompetent as the original developer.

Project owner/developers.  I’ve found that working with project owners who are also part-time developers also can be a pain to work with, but not always.  The ones that come to me realizing that creating an application isn’t easy and requires time they don’t have and knowledge they don’t have time to acquire tend to be okay.  Those that say it should be ‘fast’ and ‘easy’ for someone with your skills have their expectations set too high.  Software development, in many respects, is more art than science.

Always complains about cost.  Every client wants their custom software done cheap, quick, and on time.  The industry joke is to pick two of those qualities.  Software development of custom software isn’t cheap, nor is it quick in most cases.  If they balk at the initial estimate it probably won’t get any better.  They certainly won’t like any change orders.  We had one prospective client ask us three times, over the course of a year and a half, what the price was going to be to complete their project.  I don’t know if they expected our price to go down, or what, but eventually they found a developer to do their project at the price they wanted.  And then had the audacity to come back six months later then that developer couldn’t deliver.

Been through many developers.  Perhaps my biggest red flag of them all is when someone comes to us after going through several other developers.  Listen to their complaints about the other developers.  Were they too slow, did they charge too much?  I’ve even asked for permission to contact the previous developer to get the news from the developer perspective.  The community is small so there’s a good chance I know them and I know I’ll get the developers perspective.  Use those connections if you can because you might discover some useful information about the client and the project.

Just because you need the work doesn’t mean you should take every project that comes your way.  Be selective because you’ll avoid some heartache and probably enjoy your work more.  What red flags have you developed over the years?

MBS Xojo Developer Conference 2017

Xojo isn’t having their annual conference as they’ve decided to switch back to spring events. Since they last did one in October of 2016 they are not doing one in 2017. It makes me sad that I won’t see my friends until 2018. Thankfully, Monkeybread Software is holding a Xojo conference in Berlin on May 4th and May 5th, 2017 to tide me over..

This two day conference, held in the heart of Berlin, Germany, will boast the biggest Xojo get together of the year. Several people from Xojo Inc will be attending and Geoff Perlman will deliver the keynote address where I’m sure we’ll hear about many of the upcoming features of Xojo.

We will be there too. Carol will be giving a Database Design Mistakes session that she was hoping to give at XDC 2016 but had to cancel due to a grandson showing up. I will be giving a Reporting in Xojo talk showing off Shorts and some of the new features we’ll have added to the product by then.

I can’t emphasize enough how much I love these conferences. It’s where we can learn some new things about Xojo, and, more importantly, make friendships that can last a lifetime. I can tell you, from experience, that meeting the people you’ve ‘talked’ to on the forums is a magical experience.

Carol and I have never been to Berlin so we will do some sightseeing. We haven’t set our flights yet but we’ll be happy to try and coordinate with our Xojo friends. Let us know what sorts of things you’re doing and dates.

See you in Berlin, May 4th and 5th. To register for the conference, please go to http://www.monkeybreadsoftware.de/xojo/events/register.shtml

May your 2017 be better than 2016.

BKS Shorts 1.8.0

BKeeney Software has released version 1.8 of our reporting classes and tool for Xojo.

Thanks for using BKS Shorts, the premier reporting tool for Xojo projects. We appreciate all of the feedback we’ve received over the course of the year. Trust me when I say that
Shorts wouldn’t be where it is without your dedicated use and feedback of issues, concerns, and feedback requests.

Version 1.8 fixes a rather insidious bug that’s been in the Designer since day one. The Top property for PrintItems was always reported as relative to the top of the page. Well, this is just plain wrong because in a banded reporting tool Top and Left should be relative to the BAND, not the page. This one change literally affected everything from read & write, to drawing of the display, to all of the mouse handling. PLEASE REPORT ANY ISSUES YOU FIND ASAP to Mantis.

Version 1.8 is the last major release of the 1.x series. Version 2 will add Report Headers/Footers and a new SQL engine that will hopefully make reports much faster than they are today. When Xojo gets their act together for 64 bit debugging you can be sure we’ll do 64 bit debugging and make sure things work. A stretch goal for version 2 is subreports. VERSION 2.0 will be an upgrade.

Full change list:

New:

  • Added Informix to the list of databases
    • Uses the SQL Plugin from MonkeyBread Software. Requires additional license purchase from MBS.
  • Added Constants to the tool. Essentially a Dictionary that allows a user to add constants to a report without having to put it in a database table.
    • Constants show up in the Tool List
    • Constants Editor is invoked under the Report menu in the Demo
    • Constants are saved in the JSON string and can be changed at runtime before rendering
    • Constants are by report. Please let us know if you want global constants.
  • Added the ability to have nested conditional statements in the filter data option of Report Designer.
    • Added two integer properties (Leading and Trailing) to PAF_DatabaseKit.QueryCondition required to include these in SerializeJSON, Constructor, and Clone methods
    • updates to winDBFilter adding a mousedown event and UpdateList method.
    • Also modified Display method to accomodate the nested conditions
      updatte to winDBFilter added pushbuttons to add, remove and clear groupings.
    • update to winDBFilter added headerpressed event to prevent sorting of clumns in listbox so logic is not changed

Changes:

  • Added graphics to the primitive elements (line, rect, oval, image, text) you can drag to the design canvas
  • Removed the metadata shortcuts.
  • Turned off sorting filters by column in winDBFilter to prevent changes in filter logic
  • Changed location of Sakila (example database) download location.
  • Resize item behavior changed a bit from previous version. WANT FEEDBACK.

Bug Fixes:

  • When rendering directly from JSON string the DB schema isn’t rescanned unless necessary.
  • Exporting to CSV not brings back all rows.
  • When changing a text format to an already existing style, the stylename was not being updated, thus in some cases causing the style to revert to the default.
    This was a particular problem when saving a report and then printing directly to a PDF.
  • Positioning of the items in the bands is now relative to the band rather than the page.
    • So setting an item to (0,0) will put it to the top/left of the band it’s assigned rather than moving it to top/left of the page.
  • Fixed issue with Encoding of special characters. (Thanks to Valdemar De Sousa)
  • May have found the issue causing occasional hard crash. Had to do with updating the Property List after it had already been dismissed

Product home page at http://www.bkeeney.com/allproducts/bkeeney-shorts/

Windows Printing Broken in Xojo R4

We’ve done a lot more testing with Shorts and R4.1 this week.  Wow.  Where to begin.  I guess the first thing to say is if you need to print in Windows stick with Xojo Release 3 for now.  R4, with its switch to Direct2D has completely messed up printing.

Using Shorts, and Xojo R3 this is what a normal print looks like.  (Forget about the colors and stuff, I’m testing things out and the ugly colored blocks help).  Looks like it should:

Exact same code in 2016 R4.1 and this is what it looks like.  Note:  the picture makes it worse than it is, it’s not slanted like that on the page, my camera angle is just weird.  But, you can clearly see that while the lines and rectangles printed properly, there’s no text!

It’s obvious that the Direct2D from GDI+ in R4 were not properly tested.  Part of that is on us, the beta test community, but it seems, to me at least, that Xojo didn’t do enough vetting themselves.

The good news is that the Shorts display works fine as well the output to PDF.  So if you don’t actually print directly from your Shorts application you’ll be okay.

I expect better of Xojo.

Xojo 2016 R4.1

Xojo 2016 R4.1 was released today.  The 4.1 release mostly contains Windows fixes related to the switch in drawing engines.  Gone is GDI Plus and Direct2D is now used instead.

GDI Plus wasn’t only deprecated but removed so that is a little different than most Xojo releases.  It is highly recommend that you test your Windows apps thoroughly before release.  It’s also recommended that you test your 64 bit builds as well since it’s a newer framework and has received less attention.  Just today I found out that SegmentedControls don’t draw right in Windows 64 bit builds.  Feedback id 46268

As always, take a look at the full release notes for pertinent information.

Monkeybread Software released version 16.5 of their plugins today http://www.mbsplugins.de/archive/2016-12-12/MBS_Xojo__Real_Studio_plug-ins and is recommended for all users.  Einhugur http://www.einhugur.com has released a number of updated plugins for R4 and has indicated that more are updates are coming.

Xojo 2016 R4 (The Xojo IDE I Always Needed)

Xojo 2016 Release 4 hit the web today.  In many respects this is the IDE that I wish had been released three and a half years ago as a few of the more insidious features bugs have been fixed.  And, as usual, there is a plethora of new features, changes and bug fixes that make R4 a must-have release.  Let’s get to it!

First, the tabs in the IDE now work like most of us want them too.  Open an object, say a window, into a new tab.  By default this tab is locked and it will stay in that window.  The small back and forward arrows at the top of the navigator are not even visible.  To ‘use’ the tab for another object click on the lock symbol in the tab to unlock it.  It might take a click on the name of the Window at the top of the navigator but the arrows come back and you can navigate back to the project stack.  Or, as I tend to do just close the tab and open another object.

In a somewhat related fix, the Back and Forward arrows in the toolbar now work properly per tab.  As you navigate through an object, choosing the back button remembers where you’ve been in that object.  In previous releases the Back and Forward arrows seemed to be a exercise in random number theory as it seemed to go to locations in the IDE I had never visited.  There might have been a pattern to it but usually I just never bothered to use the buttons.

If nothing else, these two changes are a compelling reason to use R4.  The locked tab feature and the back/forward buttons never worked the way I wanted to use them.  It is sad that it took this long to get it right.

The Navigator filter received some updates too.  Now you can use type’s like ‘type:property’ will only find properties.  ‘Type:shared%’ will only find anything that’s shared.  It’s pretty powerful and I recommend playing with it a bit to get used to it.

There is now a contextual menu item for Pictures to convert them to an Image Set and put the selected picture in the first image slot.  This eliminates multiple steps with the mouse and is a very useful addition.

For Windows users there has been some changes.  UseGDIPlus has been deprecated and is replaced with Direct2D drawing.  Make sure to test any of your Windows apps that use a lot of drawing in a graphics object as things might have changed a little with the switch to Direct2D.

New Picture only creates 32 bit depth pictures and this now matches what the other target platforms do by default.  This also means that NewPicture method is deprecated.  HiDPI builds for Windows are no longer beta.

Xojo cloud received a major update.  Uploads to Xojo Cloud are now much faster.  Libraries are now cached by the server so only code and image resources are uploaded.  For example, in R3 one of our largest web projects took over three minutes to upload.  The first time I used R4 it took a little over two minutes (it was caching new libraries) but every time I uploaded the project thereafter it took a mere 44 seconds to upload.  That’s a significant time savings!

The WebListbox now has a CellPicture method that allows you to assign a WebPicture to it.  The WebSession shutdown mechanism has been refactored to help keep sessions from getting stuck and not quitting.  Exceptions in Websession.close no longer keep subsequent sessions from closing.

Due to changes, especially on the Windows side, you might want to check on updated versions of your plugins.  MonkeyBread software recommends version 16.5, or newer with R4.  16.5 is currently in preview and they expect to release it next week.  Einhugur has a couple of updated plugins for Release 4 as well.

As with any major Xojo release, you should test your projects thoroughly before releasing anything into the wild.  The beta program catches a lot of bugs but it’s not a perfect program.  One such bug that got through is an Application crash when using the Super button in the Inspector.  Until a fix is released type the class super by hand rather than using the dialog.

R4 is a small, but significant release.  It moves Windows forward using Direct2D drawing, and Xojo Cloud is significantly faster for deployment, but perhaps the changes to the IDE are the most important.  The Navigator is not nearly as horrible as it was in previous releases and, in my opinion, makes it as useful, now, as the Real Studio IDE.  If you are still using Real Studio I recommend checking out R4 as I think it takes most of the pain out of using Xojo.

What’s new, changed, or fixed, that makes you happy?

Beta Program Incentives

I’ve been part of the beta program for over a decade.  Many cycles I bemoan the fact that I’ve found very little time to real testing before its released.  That’s bad and I suspect many of my fellow members of the beta program feel much the same way.

The incentive to be in the beta program is simple.  See the new features first and help find bugs and along the and way offer some advice and guidance on how new features work.  And in general, make the product better.  That is an incentive and it’s a laudable one but many cycles that’s not enough.  Perhaps there’s a way to give us more incentives.

I fight with finding time to beta test.  I’m often working under deadlines with real projects that I can’t afford to release a version with the beta.  There’s no way around that.  Perhaps there is something that Xojo can do to make it worth my while to do more testing.

What if Xojo gave a percentage off, say 5%, off a license purchase (either new or upgrade) if I hit some threshold of credible bug reporting?  I spend a lot of money on licenses so that might be a good incentive for me (or at least one of my developers) to work with the beta on a regular basis.

Obviously there would need to be ground rules to prevent abuse.  Bug reports must be well defined with demonstrable repeatability, example project, video, etc. to make sure there’s not a flood of crap.  After it’s reviewed by a Xojo engineer that bug report gets applied to our account.  Then when it comes time for renewal we can apply the discount we’ve earned.  Perhaps that means a percentage point for every five credible bug reports (not feature requests) during a release cycle with a maximum percentage.

Make a game of it.  Reward outstanding bug reporters with recognition.  Make the participant list public so everyone is aware that so-and-so is participating and finding a lot of bugs.  Maybe reward the yearly ‘winner’ with free or discounted admission to XDC.  As a person always on the lookout for new Xojo talent this might be a good way find someone as well as having a little fun with it.

I see this as a way to get new users involved.  For me a license is no big deal but for some it’s huge and if that user has extra time (or at least more than me) that will give them extra incentive to submit bug reports.

I get it it.  The beta program should be a win-win for Xojo and us users.  The reality is that I feel like we’re free labor to a certain extent.  I don’t feel much love from Xojo even though I *know* they do appreciate whatever beta testing we do.  Offer some discounts, make it a game.  Do something to entice us!

What are your thoughts?