Thoughts on Xojo Web Edition

When Web Edition for Xojo (then Real Studio) was released I can’t say I was overly impressed.  It was missing some features and was buggy (to put it mildly).  I was of the opinion that it just wouldn’t take off.

Since then the worst of the bugs were fixed and the worst of the framework problems were addressed and there’s been a steady improvement in the product in practically every release.  In my consulting business it’s went from being a ‘gee that’s a nice thing to have’ to being roughly half of our overall Xojo consulting business.

The fact that we had very little web development experience hasn’t stopped us from using Xojo for a lot of projects.  It’s great that a WebButton and a regular desktop Button and that a WebPage and Window act the same from a developer standpoint.  All the code experience that we learned over the course of a decade in desktop apps was, with a few notable exceptions (*cough* constructors *cough*), was immediately transferrable to web apps.  While there is a learning curve it’s not like we had to learn a completely new programming language to do some large and complex web apps.  In fact, we turned down work before Web Edition came out simply because we didn’t have the experience and in-house know how to do the work.

Our clients seem willing to forgo the numerous capabilities and power of a desktop app for the more limited capabilities of a browser based app.  I think the biggest reason being that web apps don’t have distribution issues.  There’s only one instance of the app sitting on a server somewhere.  Web apps also work in almost every desktop browser and even work with most mobile web browsers.  Heck, you can even configure the web app to look different based upon what device it’s being viewed on.

There are some disadvantages, of course, to Xojo web apps.  You can’t just put them up on any ol’ server.  You pretty much need a VPS or use the new Xojo Cloud (which is just a specially configured VPS).  Then you have to worry about 32-bit compatibility libraries but, honestly, once you get the first app running on a server the rest of them are pretty easy.  I’ve not had the pleasure of getting a Xojo web app working on IIS but I hear it’s not a pleasure, nor quick, experience.

Apps running in a web browser have a limited subset of capabilities. With Xojo web apps you can’t use drag and drop anywhere out of the box (I think you can do some of this with JQuery but I’ve not tried yet).  The controls, particularly the WebListBox, are lacking a lot of functionality, and there’s just not a wealth of 3rd party controls available for Web Edition yet.

Security-wise, Xojo web apps are compiled making it very hard to compromise an app even if a hacker gets into your server.  There’s still work to make your app secure from SQL injection attacks but that’s a relatively simple thing.  Much of the work is really securing your server so that it’s secure and that’s one thing that Xojo Cloud is doing well (perhaps too well based on my recent experience).

So the question, Dear Readers, is what are your biggest likes and dislikes about Xojo Web Edition?  What do you wish it did better or differently?

2 thoughts on “Thoughts on Xojo Web Edition

  1. I don’t have much experience because I don’t have a web license Perhaps my first “dislike” is that I cannot afford it at the moment and I feel like I cannot properly test anything in a “live” setting. (Of course it’s not xojo’s fault that I cannot afford it). My second complaint is that mouse down (or was it key down?) didn’t work for me. I wanted to have a canvas or text box that the user can nudge by either pressing arrow keys or even using buttons with arrows on them. It could just be my inexperience but “other things” needed my attention so I had to put WE learning on the back burner. Had it been as easy as desktop version, I would probably be way behind on those “other things” lol.

    • Well, with Xojo you can do all the development you want without a license. You just need the license to do a final build.

      As far as keydown events they definitely work with some caveats. WebDialogs are notorious for NOT getting KeyDown events (the underlying WebPage still gets them) . Otherwise I’ve not had too many issues with them.

      There *is* a learning curve as you discovered. I think in some cases it’s a matter of unlearning some of the tricks and shortcuts we’ve used for years on desktop apps.

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