You Don’t Need to Be A Rock Star

I have been a Xojo consultant for nearly fourteen years.  It’s crazy to think it’s been that long and it’s sometimes hard to remember back to the early days of how I knew nothing and didn’t even realize that I knew nothing.

It also tickles me to no end that people consider me an ‘important’ person in the community.  Some might even consider me a ‘rock star’.  I claim no fame in the Xojo world other than I’ve stuck it out when many other developers have left the Xojo ecosystem.  Let’s just say that at times I feel like I’m the Last Man (consultant) Standing.

Can you become a Xojo consultant?  Absolutely!  There is nothing special about what I’ve done and you can do it too.  I have an electrical engineering degree so it’s not like I’m an idiot and it wasn’t until I met my wife who happened to be a software developer that I was given permission to change careers.

In retrospect that was the best thing that ever happened to me (besides meeting the love of my life).  I was an uninspiring engineer and I dreaded many of the tasks that I performed on a daily basis.  Software development, on the other hand, inspires me.  I wake up every day and (usually) can’ wait to start coding.  The fact that I get paid to do it is just icing on the cake.  To get paid to do what I love?  Sign me up!

If you know a little bit about Xojo you can become a consultant.  First, ask yourself WHY you want to be a consultant.  If it’s for the money don’t expect it to happen right away.  I think it was two or three years before we really made any money at it.  It took six years before I hired a second developer and ten years before a third and twelve before bringing my wife on as a software developer (she had always been doing those pesky taxes and payroll things that I hate doing).

So if you do become a consultant don’t expect to make money right away.  Or if you do, don’t expect the money to be consistent for a number of years.  Even now we fight with cash flow so it takes some discipline to ride out the really good times when cash flow is great and the not-so-good times when cash flow is poor.

The road to becoming a ‘name’ is not a quick one.  I spent many years in obscurity.  The first developer conference I went to I was a wall flower and barely talked to anyone.  By the third conference I co-hosted a session with another consultant because I didn’t feel like I was qualified enough to do it on my own.  Now I’m a regular presenter at the developer conferences.

One way to become a recognized name in the community is to teach others.  I’ve written a fair number of tutorials and example projects and I decided to doing video training and so far I’ve got about sixty-two hours of video available for streaming (and offline use now) with hundreds of individual videos and project files for new developers to learn from.

I think this is the part that makes people think that I’m a ‘rock star’.  I get people coming up to me all the time at conferences and engaging me in conversation and thanking me for some forum post, tutorial, or training video that made a difference for them.  It’s gratifying and sometimes a little scary (as an introvert) to have people do that.

Here’s my dirty little secret on those tutorials, example projects, and training videos.  Those are my way to learn something about Xojo and leveraging that experience for others.  Put another way:  The best way to learn something is to teach it to others.  If you are not doing something like this (maybe not for sale but for yourself) you should be.  That’s the only way you’re going to learn parts of Xojo you don’t know as well.  You really don’t want to learn new stuff on client projects (though it does happen occasionally).

As a consultant I don’t know everything.  There are still things that I’ve never touched in Xojo and things that I touch so rarely that I have to go relearn it.  Those small projects become invaluable review later on.

I don’t want to discourage anyone from becoming a Xojo consultant.  It’s not an easy road at times and it is sometimes frustrating and you put in long hours and you deal with bad clients and all the really bad things that come with consulting.  But the money can be good, it can be fun, it can be rewarding, and some clients you’ll be friends with for many years.  If you love, truly love, coding and enjoy the mysteries of it and putting the pieces of the puzzle together then maybe you, too, can become a rock star consultant.

Happy coding!

3 thoughts on “You Don’t Need to Be A Rock Star

  1. 14 years ?
    newbies 😛
    just kidding

    Everything you’ve said is true
    At first its scary because you don’t necessarily have a consistent paycheque every 2 weeks like you might when you’re an employee. Thats sometimes the biggest hurdle to get past.
    Once you do, being self-employed is at times liberating and other times agonizing.

    But, being self-employed, you have the right to tell the boss what a jerk he is 😛

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