Training Site is Cancelled

It is with great sadness that I’ve finally killed our Real Studio/Xojo training web app. Ever since API 2.0 came out, and the upcoming changes to Web, iOS, and eventually Android the training app was breathing on fumes. It was increasingly obsolete and out of date. Late last year I purposely disabled anyone from creating a new subscription and no one complained. So today it was deleted and my Xojo Cloud account cancelled.

The training site was originally in Joomla and it was a major pain to administer and use. That’s mainly because of Joomla but it served its purpose – as it proved that there was a market for the training videos (albeit a small one). When Xojo for Web came out I figured it was a good fit for me and great way to learn (I remember sitting in the flat in Nigeria working on it) and I learned a lot about Xojo web apps (the good, the bad, the ugly).

At its height there were over 200 videos covering everything from the Editors in Real Studio and Xojo, to many of the major classes, most of the controls, desktop, web, and iOS applications. I even had two start-to-finish desktop application and one start-to-finish web application projects. Most of the videos came with a project file with code for people to download and use. Over 11,000 hours of video had been streamed from my Xojo web apps including a large chunk of it on Xojo Cloud. That’s not nothing.

Some people have asked why I just didn’t update them for modern Xojo. The answer is time. For every minute of video there is at least ten minutes off-screen work between creating the project and editing the recording so that viewers didn’t see the twenty minutes of me trying to figure out why there was an error in code or hear the um’s and ah’s while I was talking. Add in the fact that Xojo changes every three months and it would be a never ending project. As it is it’s been over a year since I’ve added new videos and I don’t miss it as it’s a lot of work.

The training videos were never popular enough to pay for my time but I’m glad I did them as I learned a lot doing them. One thing I learned is that people new to Xojo liked it when I made mistakes. Early on I was worried that people would be mad if the videos weren’t perfect. Instead they learned how to debug watching me figure out what was wrong and that’s something that’s very hard to do via printed material.

Early on I also learned that I used a LOT of filler words. So I joined Toastmasters and learned to enjoy the silence between thoughts. I started doing less talking while typing during the videos and this led to faster typing (or rather sped up video while typing) and then better explanation of what I had just typed. Really, record yourself someday to hear what your fillers words are. 🙂

I answered a thread on the Xojo forums a while back on why isn’t there any training videos on a site like Udemy. The answer, again, is time and money. Just for grins I started doing an outline of what I thought a really good class on Xojo would be and I stopped when I got to a hundred topics. That’s one hundred videos that would be on average of 15 minutes each (some shorter and longer obviously) and given the math above it would be a full-time job with little gain. Xojo is, after all, a small market and it changes so rapidly that it would always be in need of updating.

If you were one of the subscribers, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. It was my pleasure creating something you hopefully learned from.

Until we meet again. Happy Xojo coding!