Xojo 2019 Release 3

Xojo 2019 Release 3 hit the internet today.  It’s only been three weeks since R2 was released and while this release has a number of bug fixes that are important this release is mostly about iOS.

R3 introduces a new ColorGroup class that will eventually come to all targets but for now it’s only available for iOS.  The ColorGroup has its own editor and allows the developer to set or choose colors they want to use.  You can choose Single, Dual, or Named colors.  I’m not entirely sure the point of the Single color, but Dual allows you to change a single color based on Light or Dark mode, and then there is the Named option.  

I feel that the Named option is the more valuable of the settings as it allows you to select what type of ‘color’ you’re using and allow to use, or modify the default colors in Light or Dark Mode.  For example, if I simply wanted to use the default colors of an iOSLabel I can select the ColorGroup from a new popup in the Inspector.  The control then will automatically use the Label color.  But if I want to override the defaults I can do so here for both Light and Dark modes.

This has the promise to help Xojo developers that are supporting Light and Dark Modes in their applications.  Since it’s currently for iOS only and I’m not actively working on an iOS project I can’t speak to its effectiveness and usefulness in coding.  I feel that the ColorGroup editor was slow to respond to color picker changes.  If you have some firsthand knowledge of the ColorGroup in action please leave a comment below.

The iOSTextArea control has a new Border Style and Border Color properties that allow you to create rectangle and rounded borders.  SF Symbols can be retrieved by the iOS framework using the iOSImage.SystemImage shared method.  The iOSRectangle now supports Blue effects.

After iOS there are number of new additions and changes that are part of the API 2.0 work.  If you are interested please read the release notes.  I am not actively using API 2.0 in any projects so these changes don’t mean anything to me yet.

Some Windows bug fixes:  The Draw Caution/Note/Stop icons are updated to the newer look for Windows Vista and later.  The app now terminates when the system sends a shutdown message (like when an installer is trying to update the app).  The GroupBox no longer draws funny when the caption font size is different than the default.

Some Linux bug fixes:  Changing the Label Text Color no longer leaks memory.  Clipping the listbox graphics in the CelLTextPaint or CellBackgroundPaint now works as expected.

With iOS Dark Mode out of the way, hopefully this means that 2020 R1 will have the long awaited Web 2.0.  My gut feeling is that Web 2.0 won’t be released until Xojo.Connect at the end of March and even then it might be only in beta form.  Web 2.0 is a complete rewrite from the ground up that’s been underway for a while.  Maybe I’m wrong but experience says they’ll want something big and flashy to show off.  Of course I also expect more from Android but I still expect that to be in alpha and nowhere near ready for release.

R3 is mainly an iOS release for Dark Mode and some changes for API 2.0 and then mostly bug fixes.  As always, before using you should read the release notes and then thoroughly test your application before issuing any releases.

Enterprise Code Signing for iOS in Xojo

There’s been a feedback report (47975) for several years asking for the ability to use enterprise code signing certificates for building our Xojo iOS applications.  So far nothing from Xojo but there is a way to create enterprise code signed iOS app for Xojo – it just takes some extra work.

Here are my steps to building an iOS enterprise app:

  • Build your app in Xojo with the Build for App Store switch turned off.
  • Build the built app into a folder named “Payload”
  • Compress that folder.  Change the name from Payload.zip to “yourappname.ipa”.
  • In your favorite text editor paste the following code.  Replace App_ID_Prefix and App_ID with the valid information for your app from the Apple Developer website:

<?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″?>

<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC “-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN” “http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd”>

<plist version=”1.0″>

<dict>

<key>application-identifier</key>

<string>App_ID_Prefix.App_ID</string>

<key>keychain-access-groups</key>

<array>

<string>App_ID_Prefix.App_ID</string>

</array>

</dict>

</plist>

  • Save this file as Entitlements.plist
  • Go to the Apple developer website and download your enterprise developer provisioning profile.
  • Download iReSign project from https://github.com/maciekish/iReSign (see note below)
  • Run the ReSign app
  • Drag unsigned .ipa file to the top box, or use the brown button.
  • Drag your mobileprovision file you downloaded from Apple to the second box, or use the browse button.
  • Drag your Entitlements.plist file you created earlier into the 3rd box, or use the browse button.
  • Select your name from Keychain Access List.  For example it might be, “iPhone Developer:  Firstname Lastanme (XXXXXXX) from the dropdown.
  • Click ReSign! and with.  The resigned filed will be in the same folder as the original with (Resigned) in the name.
  • Voila!  Move that resigned file into the appropriate place and remove the Resigned so it’s back to the yourappname.ipa” name.
  • Now you can deploy your enterprise code signed app to any iOS device.

Each iOS device may have to trust the certificate.  Go to Settings -> General -> Device Management.

For it to work properly in MacOS Sierra (and above) I had to recompile the ReSign app in Xcode (no code changes).

It seems like a lot of steps but once you get it working it’s not hard after that. One thing we learned the hard way is that enterprise certificates expire in a year so plan renewing the certificate and getting a new version out before it expires.

Hopefully someone will find this useful.

[Update]: My iOS Build settings for Team are set to “None”

2018 Was a Weird Year

I hope everyone’s holiday season was good.  We’re approaching the end of 2018 and I find it nice to reflect on what’s happened and what we’ve accomplished this year.

Looking Back

Let’s start off with the blog posts.  I did 41 (well now 42) blog posts in 2018.  Five were about Xojo releases.  Four were BKeeney Software product releases.  Four posts were about the Xojo Developers Conference.  The rest were a variety of Xojo related topics.

The most highly commented blog post was from June called Chasing Xojo where I lamented that Xojo, at least until that point, seemed to be a less stable when it came to Windows and Linux due to major revamping of the drawing systems on both platforms.  In Windows, Xojo doesn’t flicker as much but the struggle to get speed was a concern for all of 2018.  In Linux, the switch to GTK 3 wasn’t as smooth as we could have hoped.

The most viewed blog post was from August called Xojo 2018 Release 2 where I did my usual review of the most recent release of Xojo.  I heavily criticized Xojo for their poor documentation in that release.  I received plenty of blowback on that one.  But I think the end result is that R3 and R4 documentation was much better.

We released two new products with BKS Report Studio and BKS Tab Control.  Report Studio is our reporting utility meant for end-users for macOS and Windows and it was built using the award winning Shorts reporting classes (also a blog post).  The Tab Control is a canvas subclass that replaces, and extends, the built-in Xojo tab control in many ways and was our attempt at replaced the old CustomTabControl that many use but is unusable for HiDPI apps.

The other major release of the year was ARGen 3.0.  ARGen is our utility to create Xojo projects that creates ActiveRecord objects.  Among the many changes was the ability to generate ActiveRecord objects for iOS projects, supporting GUID primary keys, and the ability to include Audit Trail, Localization, and Database Update modules that help in many products.  We use ActiveRecord in practically every project and having the ability to generate some basic desktop and web UI is a huge time saver.

2018 sure seemed like a mixed bag for Xojo.  The Windows drawing issues took up a good chunk of the year and I think R4 was the first solid Windows release (although I still have 2 client apps that won’t remote debug in R4).  I can’t imagine the amount of effort that Xojo and the community put into getting Windows drawing fixed.

64-bit remote debugging became a reality for all targets this year.  64-bit compiling isn’t the huge gain that many in the community hoped for but then we always want more.  We just have to remember that 64-bit doesn’t necessarily mean ‘faster’.  At least the debugger works and that’s not nothing.

Dark Mode came soon after the release of Mojave.  The IDE works in Dark Mode and we were given many of the tools to implement it in our own projects.  Dark Mode only works in MacOS but some are already clamoring for it in Windows too.  It’s still to early to tell if Dark Mode is a hit on Mojave much less in xojo.

Looking Forward

What is 2019 going to bring us?  For one, we’re almost finished with a fairly significant update to Formatted Text Control and after that’s released we’ll start with an even bigger version 4 update to the venerable word processing control to bring it up to date and extend its capabilities to make it even more powerful.

We have a number of large consulting projects that have been in gestation for many months and years.  It will be nice to have a big project or two to keep us busy.

With the release of Web 2.0 I will redo all of our Xojo training videos related to web.  They’ve been outdated for a while but it’s not worth redoing the videos until Xojo releases Web 2.0.  If they release Android I’ll start on at least some intro videos for that too.  This might finally be the year that I redo the remaining Real Studio videos.  No doubt I’ll redo them just before a major IDE change.  🙂

What do I expect from Xojo?  That’s a tough question to answer since they’re so damn secretive now.  I expect Web 2.0 to show up in time for XDC (so maybe release 2?).  I think it will be pretty solid in the first release but it wouldn’t expect it to be good until the following release.

I also think that at XDC we’ll get an alpha of InterOps but not anything other than another dog and pony show for Android.  Targeting another platform is long and tedious process and involves some serious IDE work.  How much of the iOS editors can they use?  I can only guess but at first blush I say not much.

Some of Android’s success may hinge on getting iOS to use the global framework and away from the Xojo Framework.  Nothing like rewriting an entire framework while keeping backwards compatibility.  The more I think about it the more I think the iOS rework is put on hold until Android is released.  

Which leads to API 2.0 in general.  We’ve already seen some of the first new controls to use API 2.0.  URLConnection was introduced in 2018 R4 with mixed success.  I would expect more API 2.0 controls to show up.

So what do you think?  Was 2018 a successful year for Xojo?  What do you see happening in 2019?

ARGen 3.0

BKeeney Software Inc. is proud to announce that ARGen, our ActiveRecord Generator utility for Xojo developers, has a new major update.  Version 3.0 includes a host of new features including the ability to generate ActiveRecord classes for Xojo iOS projects, the ability to use GUID primary keys, the option to include a database update module, include an audit trail module, and include a UI localization module.  There are also new ways to arrange your user interface layouts that can save you even more time when initially creating a project.  In addition to these major new features, ARGen fixes a number of bugs and provides more enhancements.

ARGen has versions for macOS and Windows.  It costs $99.95 but can be used in limited mode at no cost.  Existing version 2.x users will be provided an upgrade opportunity with a 50% discount or they contact us at support at bkeeney dot com to get an upgrade coupon.

Pricing, examples, and more details can be found at the project homepage at https://www.bkeeney.com/allproducts/argen/

3.0 Release Notes:

New:

* iOS ActiveRecord!

* Reorder fields in the order they should be displayed. This would work both on List and Edit forms.

* Name labels for generated UI elements

* Switch between horizontal and vertical alignment for UI fields and labels

* Projects can now have individual Namespaces

* GUID support (except for ODBC connections)

* Can now include a Database Update module

* Can now include an Audit Trail module

* Can now include a Localization module

* Warnings for aggregates that conflict with Xojo (note below)

* New database connection window

* New app icon

 

Removed:

* Oracle databases are no longer supported

 

Fixed:

* Add / Edit dialog now shows in web version (#3556)

* Icon now displays properly in alerts (#3474)

* PostgreSQL Views now working

* Control init on add and edit windows

* Preferences now correctly handles prefix and suffix settings

* Selecting suffix no longer causes a compile error

* Confirmation dialogs are now set up properly (#3643)

* MenuBarVisible is no longer false on any template windows (#3475)

* Rescan Schema works again

 

Changed:

* Database specific PreparedStatements

* Instances of MsgBox replaced with MessageBox (#3474)

* Enhanced Save() on add and edit windows

* Listbox.Open() now has a ColumnWidths placeholder for convinience

* Desktop projects now created with HiDPI on

* Desktop projects now default to 64 bit for Mac

* Opening a SQLite project automatically attempts to connect (#3596)

* Auto-Generate UI step is now easier to understand

Aggregates Note:

When using aggregate like Count(), Max(), Min() some DBs will return the aggregate as the field name.

Added code to warn on open project that there is invalid for xojo field names, and fail generate. 

Xojo 2017 Release 2

Last week Xojo 2017 Release 2 hit the download servers. This release has the usual mix of new, changes, and bug fixes. At first blush it doesn’t seem like there is a lot to mention but there is, but I’ll get to that in a minute.

Before we get into the highlights it’s worth mentioning, again, that R2 does not have 64-bit debugging for Windows. As Xojo mentioned in their blog post (http://blog.xojo.com/2017/07/26/the-best-laid-plans-64-windows-debugging/) the LLVM compiler and toolset just wasn’t ready to be included in R2.

Despite the lack of a 64-bit debugger for Windows a number of things were corrected in 64-bit Windows builds. Icons are now applied correctly and they also show the correct version information. The 64-bit MS SQL Server database plugin now works when compiled on the Mac. Game Input Manager also works in 64-bit now. Images assigned to an ImageWell are now drawn properly.

Also related to 64-bit builds, the Split and Join functions for Unicode strings is much faster and Replace and ReplaceAll behaves like the 32-bit versions. Exceptions no longer leak memory. Virtual Volumes now work. Copying a picture to the clipboard now works. XojoScript is now available in 64-bit builds.

Linux GTK3. See Xojo blog post (http://blog.xojo.com/2017/08/15/goodbye-gtk-2-hello-gtk-3/) detailing some of the changes. The switch to GTK3 was necessary for HiDPI support and now scales automatically on integral scale factors (i.e. 1x, 2x, 3x, etc). This also lets child controls clip properly on parent controls whereas they did not always clip properly in prior versions.

Be aware, though, that this switch may affect how your controls draw. While it’s always been true that default control sizes are bigger in Linux you could sometimes cheat and use the open events (or subclass the controls) and make them slightly larger in Linux and perhaps make the system font a little smaller and things would look good enough to not require a bigger UI change. With this switch to GTK3, however, it seems like some controls, PopupMenu and Pushbutton come readily to mind, in that their caption location is definitely lower than the prior version thus making them look odd without more work. For me, what worked in R1.1 just doesn’t look good in R2.

This change begs the question that if we could make a Xojo theme for Linux that would make control heights smaller, text sizes smaller, and change the caption locations to make this a non-issue. Perhaps someone with more knowledge about Linux themes could answer that.

A few other things that might ruin your day in Linux is that not all Linux distributions now allow you to remove the border of TextFields. It wouldn’t surprise me if additional issues are found in GTK3 as time goes on.

iOS has a couple of important changes. The first is that the AutoLayout Priority property in prior versions was calculated on its own. In R2 new constraints get the ‘Required’ priority. Any existing projects should get thoroughly tested on multiple sized devices to make sure nothing needs to be fixed. In our own testing we had to simply change the priority to Required to fix any issues.

Another iOS change that may affect you is that setting the CopyFileStep to the “Frameworks” destination now properly creates the Frameworks folder inside the iOS package and puts the files there. Before you had to create a manual directory for it to work properly.

Another nice fix is that a numeric suffix is no longer added to copied iOS controls unless they need it. This was an annoying bug. Not hard to fix but annoying nonetheless.

The web framework received some attention in this release as well. The WebPage width and height properties are now correctly updated before the Shown event is fired. A number of WebMapViewer errors were fixed including an annoying JavaScript error on the first refresh and where it would fail if there was more than one instance used in the app at a time.

The Session timeout now takes touch events into account when figuring out the last interaction with the app. In addition to that, web apps now try to reconnect if they’ve lost connection to the web app and will continue to do so for three minutes or until the user navigates away from the disconnect screen.

The Listbox control received some updates. For Linux, HelpTags are now positioned properly and in Windows they disappear properly when the mouse leaves the control Also in Windows the endcap is drawn correctly and headers no longer flicker when hovered over by the mouse or when clicked on.

A regression was reported for R2 that affects dragging items to the Listbox. In Windows the X & Y coordinates are incorrect. This was reported in Feedback 49190.

New Drag events were added to the Listbox. Except for a jumbled paragraph in the release notes I’m not sure anyone would notice. I would spend more time talking about it but as far as I can tell these are not documented in the Language Reference, either local or online and there is no example. I find it inexcusable to have a major change to such an important control not be documented. This seems like it should automatically make it into the documentation. Do better Xojo!

The IDE received a bunch of bug fixes and changes. New items in the Menu Editor no longer ‘fly in’ and arrow keys work now. Long error messages are wrapped and row heights adjusted in the error reporter are adjusted as needed (as a side note does this forebode variable height list boxes?) Recent Items in the Project Chooser now show size, date created, and date modified when possible. Pressing the Escape key now acts as a “Revert Now” to changes.

It also appears that a regression bug was introduced in Raspberry Pi. Button.Action events don’t fire if using a touchscreen. They appear to work properly when using a mouse. Feedback 49221.

As always, look through the release notes to see what else has changed. It’s also a good idea to test your applications thoroughly when upgrading to a new version.

Xojo 2017 Release 2 was chock full of new things and changes. I hope a dot release is issued to fix some of the bigger regressions. Up next is 64-bit debugging and remote debugging, the new plugin format, interops, and Android. Think they can get it all done in 2017?

Sorry for the delay in getting this out. Those pesky clients sometimes want on-site help and the last thing I feel like doing is writing after a long day of coding.

 

The Xojo Community is Awesome

Have I told you how much I love the Xojo community?  I’ve been part of it for fifteen years and I’ve met hundreds of Xojo developers at developers conferences and probably exchanged emails with thousands more.  I am amazed at how much this community helps each other and I wish there was a way to promote that as a key feature of the product.  It’s a big deal.  Really!

If you’re just starting out using Xojo know that there are a bunch of people, myself included, that are willing to help out, if we can, on your journey.  Programming is hard.  Well, I don’t think it’s hard because I’ve been doing it for so long, but it is complex at times and that makes it hard.  Just ask your question in the Xojo forums and you’ll almost always get an answer within hours.

Even Xojo pros, such as myself, have need of help.  Xojo covers Mac, Windows, Linux desktop, console, and web apps.  It does iOS apps for iPhone and iPad.  It now does Raspberry Pi for heavens sake!  It works with dozens of different databases.  There is simply no way any one person is going to know everything there is to know about Xojo.  It just can’t happen.  So yes, I go to the forums, all the time, and ask for help.

Just the other day I asked for some help with WooCommerce.  Not Xojo related, really, but certainly related to a project we’re working on for a client.  Within a few hours I had half a dozen developers private message me saying they might be able to help.  Subsequent contact narrowed that list down a bit but the point is that I have probably shaved off several days worth of work simply by asking for advice.

I am biased towards Xojo, naturally, as it’s been my primary development language for fifteen years.  I think I’d be hard pressed to find such a friendly community.  I call many on the forums my friends even though I’ve never physically met them.  The few that I’ve met in person have lived up to their forum reputations and are really friends for life.

So maybe this is my belated Thanksgiving post.  I am thankful that so many years ago I jumped both feet first into the tool.  I asked questions – many of the silly and redundant.  I became more proficient and then made another jump to start blogging about it, making products for other developers, and training the next generation of developers.

So if you are in need of a cross-platform development tool I highly recommend Xojo.  It ain’t perfect but no development tool is.  If you jump in I think you’ll love the community.  I know I do.

What say you fellow Xojo developers?

Xojo 2016 Release 2

Last week Xojo 2016 Release 2 was unleashed to the masses.  There are a lot of changes and tweaks in this version and if you are creating web or iOS applications there is a lot of like about this release.  There are also a myriad of changes and enhancements that should satisfy most developers.

iOS Stuff

The biggest changes in R2 is for iOS and these are things that developers have been requesting since its initial release.  Support for iOS 7 has been dropped because its market share is less than 20% and the minimum required version is now iOS 8.  This also means that Xcode 7 or Xcode 8 needs to be installed.

The Xojo engineers added iOSScrollableArea which allows you to view and display content that is larger than the view.  This is a very welcome addition and is worth the upgrade for this feature alone.

R2 also adds the iOSLocation class that allows your application to request location coordinates as well as get updates from the device.  Once your application gets permission to access the device location you receive changes via the LocationChanged event that gives you latitude, longitude, altitude, course and speed parameters.  An Accuracy property lets you change the desired accuracy.  In addition to iOSLocation Xojo has added the iOSMotion class that allows developers to access the accelerometer and gyroscope.

iOSTable was arguably the most useful and least powerful control in iOS for Xojo and this release definitely gives it some love.  You can now embed controls in the cells of iOSTable by using the iOSCustomTableCell class.  This allows you to create some very rich and powerful UI that lives in the cell of an iOSTable.  I guess the best equivalent in desktop and web terms is that the iOSCustomTableCell is a specialized ContainerControl you can put into an iOSTable cell.  I’m looking forward to using this.

They’ve also added support for Row Actions in the iOSTable.  The new ActionsForRow event passes in the section and row and you have to supply the iOSTableRowAction array.  The iOSTableRowAction has a title, an Auto tag and a Style.  The style can be either Normal or Destructive with Destructive changing the background of the Action to red (does this ever vary? – not sure).

The new iOSSharingPanel allows you to share pictures, text and URL’s with any registered system service or app.  That’s a fancy way of saying you can share this data between applications.  It’s the iOS version of the clipboard available to desktop applications.

The iOSPicturePicker class allows you to select images on the device or take pictures with the camera.

To avoid confusion for users, the old SQLiteDatabase class for iOS has been renamed iOSSQLiteDatabase.  The corresponding recordset class is now named iOSSQLiteRecordSet.

Non-IOS stuff

The Web framework is now HiDPI capable.  It works similarly as desktop apps in that it queries the browser for the scaling factor.  Then, the application serves up the proper image if it can.  You can change how this works by changing the Supports HiDPI in the Shared Build Settings.

In Windows there are a number of significant HiDPI changes that make it work better in Windows 8.1 and 10.  Perhaps the biggest Windows change is that Xojo.Net.HTTPSocket is no longer much slower than HTTPSecureSocket.  I have not had a chance to look at this one in detail yet so if you’ve had success or failure with it, please leave a comment below.

Always check the release notes that are in every release.  I’m just hitting the highlights out of hundreds of line items and you never know what might be there that affects your application.

As with any new release it’s better to test your project against it before releasing it into the wild.  In my own testing I had some instability with converting an old web project (started around the very first public beta of Web Edition) to use HiDPI graphics.  This involved adding an ImageSet and adding the 1x and 2x graphics, deleting the old graphic, and then fixing it in all locations in the project.  I was able to crash the IDE but all of the crashes were different and, of course, none of it was reproducible.

The Future

The 800 pound gorilla in the room is a 64 bit IDE and 64 bit debugging.  Things like XojoScript are holding back the IDE from being 64 bit.  I would also imagine that not having an integrated debugger available in 64 bit is holding back that as well.  I know we are avoiding releasing some 64 bit projects because of these limitations. We’ve also been playing around with the Raspberry Pi and it’s definitely not very useful without the debugger.

We need the 64 bit debugger.  Let’s hope that R3 provides us with some relief in that area!

How has your experience been with R2 so far?

Xojo iOS without Android

I will be honest and say that I did not think that Xojo for web apps was going to amount to much of anything.  Granted, I said this as I was struggling with a beta of the very first release to do some actual production work.  Since then it’s gotten considerably better and more stable and it’s become an increasingly large portion of our consulting work.

I was asked the other day what I thought about Xojo for iOS.  I replied that it’s stable and the community seems to be coming up solutions at a much faster pace than Xojo for web.  But until it starts bringing income into my consulting business I’m hesitant to say much more about it.

Let’s talk about that aspect of it for a bit.  When web came out I immediately landed a few consulting projects which was an awesome (and horrifying) way to learn the new framework.  Here it is roughly six months after release and I’ve only had a few nibbles but no actual projects on Xojo for iOS projects.  This despite the ten plus hours of training video I’ve created for Xojo for iOS.

So it makes me wonder if Xojo for iOS is really going to take off.  Part of me wonders if Xojo misunderstood the market for mobile apps.  Sure, iOS is where the money seems to be, but Android has the marketshare and Windows mobile (whatever they call it these days) just keeps hanging around.  Xojo simply doesn’t address Android or Windows mobile.

I think one could reasonably argue that part of Xojo’s strength on desktop is that it makes decent apps that are cross platform and it doesn’t matter which platform you develop on.  You do have to spend extra time for a Xojo app to be 100% compliant on Mac OS X and Windows (I’ll leave Linux out of the mix since I don’t cater to that crowd) and I don’t think many people would argue that if you were going to make a Mac-only application you might want to stick with xCode and Swift or Visual Studio for making a Windows only application.

Apple and Microsoft will always have the best gadgets and goodies for those platforms.  That’s just a fact.  Xojo is often a compromise of the lowest common denominator between the platforms.  It’s RAD capabilities are important but I’m not sure that I’d give it THAT big of an advantage once you get past the learning curve of all the respective platforms and languages.

Xojo for iOS is nice and works well but I feel that without Android it’s not going to get much traction.  Xojo is known for cross-platform apps yet it only supports one mobile platform.  If you were going to go the trouble of developing for more than one mobile platform wouldn’t you go with a tool that supported more than just iOS?

I mean no disrespect to Xojo.  They’ve accomplished a pretty amazing thing.  They have an IDE that allows you to create iPhone and iPad apps without learning Swift or CocoaTouch.  However, you are limited to developing on Apple hardware (that’s Apple’s not Xojo’s fault) and to do any remote debugging you have to use the iOS Simulator that’s part of xCode.  Just that part eliminates a good chunk of Xojo’s potential market (the Windows and Linux users).

Xojo for iOS works well.  It has good developer community support.  I see no reason why developers wanting an easier mobile development environment wouldn’t choose Xojo except for one thing:  It’s iOS only.

So what do you think my fellow Xojo users?  What do you think of iOS for Xojo?  Is it anything without Android and Windows Phone or is it missing something else?

Xojo 2015 Release 2

Xojo Release 2 went public this week.  This release is a typical mishmash of new features and bug fixes.  So let’s dig into it!

iOS

The DatePicker was added to iOS.  This is a most welcome addition and let’s you switch between Time, Date, Date and Time, and Countdown Timer.  There’s still no generic data picker which is a shame.

The Launch Images and App Icons folders for iOS has now been replaced with an editor that allows you to drag and drop images into it.  If the image isn’t the appropriate size for the selected image a message appears saying what the dimensions of the image is and that it will be scaled to fit.

[Edit]   One thing I forgot (because I didn’t see them in the release notes) was that build times are much better in R2.  From comments I’ve seen it may be an order of magnitude faster.

Web Apps

If you are using the HandleSpecialURL or HandleURL the RequestHeaders now has a Secure property telling you if the request came in over a secure channel.  If you are using SSL Certificates they can be specified on the command line.  Another new web feature is the ability to set the HTTPOnly property attribute in the Session.Cookie.Set method.  This should work as a preventative measure against cross site scripting attacks against Xojo web apps.

New Framework

The new framework is making its way to more and more of the overall package.  The Xojo.Data, Xojo.Crypto, and Xojo.IO.Folderitem are now available for all targets and platforms.  The Xojo.Data namespace includes the ability to read/write JSON (no work on XML yet).  The Xojo.Crypto framework gives you access to MD5, RSAEncrypt/Decrypt, RSASign, RSASignVerify, SHA1, SHA256 and SHA512 hash methods.  Xojo.IO.Folderitem gives  you file handling.

Xojo.Net.HTTPSocket now works for all platforms (except Xojo Cloud).  It should be noted that HTTPSocket is now ONLY asynchronous.  No longer can you wait for the response but now you have to use the events from the socket.  This is really a better way of using the HTTPSocket but if you’ve been using it in the old framework synchronously you’ll need to adjust your code accordingly.

[Edit] The new HTTPSocket supports HTTP 1.1, automatically supports proxies on all platforms, and performs proper certificate validation.  It also no longer performs polling on the socket so it should be have significantly lower CPU usage.

The Xojo.Core.Timer now works properly on Mac OS X 10.7 and 10.8.  Apparently it didn’t work properly in older versions of Mac OS X.

Miscellaneous

For many, the recent addition of the Windows ICU DLL was a major setback as they were quite large.  You’ll be happy to know that they’re now statically linking them and removed the unused portion of the libraries so the built package is now considerably smaller.

The IDE receive a large number of bug fixes including a couple of memory leaks.  They also fixed how deleting items works and how the focus works when switching between tabs with the Code Editor displaying.

According to the release notes there are 147 total items that were changed in Release 2.  This number seems a little low in comparison to some previous releases.  Given the short period between the R1 release and XDC I think this makes sense and the engineers have a lot of work to do in getting ready for XDC.

I did not get as much of a chance to run the beta as I usually do but there hasn’t been a lot of chatter on the forums about issues either.  What little I did with the beta was solid and this looks to be a decent release.

Have any comments about this release?

Xojo 2015 Release 1

This week saw the release of Xojo 2015 Release 1.  This release has only a couple of new features (and one really big change) but many smaller changes and bug fixes.

The biggest new feature for Xojo is that you can now build 64 bit iOS applications.  This is a big deal because Apple is making 64 bit iOS apps mandatory for those apps submitted to the App Store.  As of February 1st submissions to the App Store must be universal 32 bit / 64 bit app bundles.

In December 2014 Xojo gave us a tentative roadmap and met it as 2015 R1 was in a usable beta on February 1st.  This is an accomplishment in and of itself since Xojo rarely, if ever, gives us their schedule.  Not only gave a schedule but met it!  I’d say lets give them some kudos for being a bit more open and accomplishing their task!

So far in testing it appears that 64 bit iOS applications are solid.  This also means that the 64 bit compiler is working and works in a 32 bit application and debugger.  According to their December 2014 blog post the next up for the 64 bit treatment is Linux web/console and this will be much anticipated by anyone that’s tried to install a Linux web app on a 64 bit Linux OS and struggled to find 32 bit compatibility libraries.

Besides 64 bit for iOS, there are a plethora of bug fixes to the IDE, the new framework, and the compiler.  To say that the IDE received some love would be an understatement.  These changes should make for a more stable development environment.  The number of bug fixes is too many to list here and I highly recommend reading the release notes.

The IDE Icon Editor received another makeover (how many is this in the past 15 years?) that allows it to handle 1024 by 1024 icons.  Some unused sizes were removed and the output format is now PNG rather than JPEG2000.  In my own testing it seemed that images moved forward from older projects didn’t look quite right so you should definitely make sure your icon images are updated before doing a release.

The Web framework received a few important updates.  WebLabels now work properly on dynamically created WebContainers.  WebCheckboxes respond properly on touch devices.  WebContainer mouse event handlers no longer interfere with scrolling.  WebListbox no longer offsets the selection if placed inside a WebContainer and accessed from a touch device.  Internet Explorer now supports gradient fills.

The new framework received new Parse functions for Integer, Double, Single and will act like the existing framework Val and CDbl functions.  What this means, in reality, is that Parse is more lenient and doesn’t throw exceptions when it can’t figure out the value of the passed in Text.  I think it’s obvious that Xojo is mindful of how we are using the new framework and reacting to our (valid) criticisms and wants and needs.

Windows and Linux users didn’t receive much love in this release, however.  The release notes only have a few for each and those seem pretty minor.  One bug fix that affects everyone, but appears to affect Windows more, was the Serial control.  It appears that it was possible to receive incorrect data.

I think many will be happy with this release.  64 bit iOS applications were a necessity and everything else was bug fixes and expansions of functionality.  I wish more releases were like this (i.e. a few new features and mostly bug fixes).

As with any new release you’ll need to test it against your own projects to find out if you have any issues.

What are your comments about Xojo 2015 Release 1?