Has Microsoft Already Lost?

I say this with no malice when I say that Real Studio is a fairly small player (development tools-wise) when compared to Microsoft and Apple.  Those two behemoths have much bigger pockets and drive the development environments on their respective platforms.  It’s also fair to say that each has little interest in supporting the other platform.

Real Studio is a good cross-platform development environment that lets a skilled developer create nice Macintosh OS X and Windows applications using one code base.  Most things ‘just work’ and the language makes it easy to take into account the occasional (and sometimes not occasional) platform specific API calls and differences.  Sometimes the differences are a royal pain but rarely have we been stymied in a project as there always seems to be another option available.  And sometimes the trick is know which things to avoid when working on cross-platform apps.

When I started doing Real Studio consulting a decade ago most of the clients who found us were hard-core Apple users.  They had to satisfy their corporate bosses by developing mainly for Windows and if they could get a Mac OS X version as a side benefit that was great.  For the past couple of years it seemed that the clients who contacted us were the corporate IT folks that had legacy Visual Basic projects and didn’t want to convert to .NET (and yes, the boss wanted a Mac version too).

In the past year, however, we’ve been contacted – a lot – by clients invested in .NET and needing a Mac version.  This isn’t just for their internal business apps either – they’re talking about commercial applications.  What’s even more interesting is the number of calls we’ve fielded by existing .NET development shops needing help.

So it begs the question:  Has Microsoft lost the battle of mindshare?  Has Apple now wedged their way into consumer and corporate America to the point where not having a Mac version of your software is a detriment to marketing and sales?

Don’t get me wrong.  Microsoft isn’t going away any time soon, but I can remember a time when if you mentioned Apple (or any non-Microsoft technology for that matter) you were derided for your obvious stupidity.  I can’t tell you how many times I was laughed at for being an Apple developer.  Now, it’s hard(er) to find diehard 100% Microsoft-only IT person.

I decided to write this post after yet another phone call with a .NET developer.  They want Mac versions and they’ve already decided on Real Studio.  But, and this is always the catch, they’re good at .NET and know next to nothing about Real Studio and nothing about Mac development.

That’s where consultants like us come in as we can help bridge the gap in knowledge.  If you’re interested, we have 36 hours of training video’s (over 100 individual videos) available to subscribers at http://www.bkeeney.com/RealStudioTraining/realstudiotraining.cgi including several projects that start from scratch.  I’ve had experience Real Studio developers tell me they’ve learned a few things even by watching the 6 hours of non-subscription video.  Perhaps your .NET developers would get something out of the training?  Perhaps some one-on-one training would helpful?  Contact me – we can help.

I digress (sorry for the shameless plugs).  Have you Real Studio developers been seeing similar trends?  Does .NET seem to be losing its luster?