MarkdownKit Review

Markdown is a popular text formatting syntax in use all over the web. Markdown was designed to be human readable in plain text, and formatting parsers are available for many different formats.

There are a few different parsers for Xojo, available in both add-on and plugin format. Garry Pettet provided MarkdownKit for us to look at and review. MarkdownKit is written entirely in Xojo code, is fully CommonMark compliant, and generates HTML.

MarkdownKit is implemented with both String and Text versions, and is designed for both Desktop and iOS projects. MarkdownKit is provided as full source code, and includes documentation as well as examples.

With everything provided, MarkdownKit is very easy to use. It really is as simple as one line. dim sHTML as String = MarkdownKit.ToHTML(SomeMarkdownString) The output can then be passed into an HTMLViewer and displayed. This can all be done so fast you get near live rendering.

The way MarkdownKit renders the input is impressive. A MarkdownKit document is parsed into a syntax tree so that an implementation of the rendering interface can walk the document. What we get from all that is a fast and accurate Markdown renderer. And wow is it fast. The demo application really illustrates the speed of MarkdownKit.

Overall MarkdownKit has proven to be speedy, well documented, easy to use, expandable, and CommonMark compliant. MarkdownKit is a great Markdown renderer written entirely in Xojo code. If you don’t yet have a Markdown renderer in your toolkit, MarkdownKit is a solid option.

More information about MarkdownKit, pricing, and the demo downloads are available at the MarkdownKit Webpage: https://garrypettet.com/xojo-addons/markdownkit

XDC 2019: Android Walkthrough

During the Android Walkthrough session at XDC Travis Hill and Paul Lefebvre showed us the current status of making Android apps via Xojo.  As Geoff said in his keynote there is considerable amount of work left to be done.

Last XDC had some compiled code running in the emulator and one control.  That was it.  

Today they have compiled code running in emulator and devices for both 32-bit and 64-bit.  APK creation.  Emulator installation and execution.  Control positioning and locking.  Now has 25 controls which is a bulk of the controls for version 1.

Buttons:  Regular, Segments, and Toolbar

Pickers:  DateChooser, Slider, Switch

Inputs:  TextField and TextArea

Decorations:  Label, canvas, oval, rectangle, and separator

Organizers:  TabPanel

Indicators:  ProgressBar, ProgressWheel

Viewers:  HTMLViewer, ImageViewer, ScrollableArea, Table, VideoViewer

NonVisual:  ImageChooser, Location, MessageBox, Timer

Tech Details:

Android is unique.  Code that executes via Java Virtual Machine and Native.  They communicate via the Java Native Interface.  The Xojo framework is built with Xojo and Kotlin.  Kotlin is recommend by Google.  But essentially we don’t have to worry about.

Application execution works with both 32-bit and 64-bit.  32-bit OS is still popular on devices.  Support ARM (devices) and x86 (emulator).  Xojo figures it out for you automatically.

Typical data types:  Integer, Double, String, Variants.

Layout editor is what we’re familiar with.  An Android ‘view’ is really just a Window.  

Uses API 2.0.   Which means Standardized naming.  Errors are exceptions.  Zero based offsets.

Requirements:  Mac/Windows 64-bit for the first version.  Linux has some unique issues.  Android Studio required to provide the emulator and debugging tools.  Android 9.0 (Pie) SDK.  Target Android 4.4 and better.  Will run on a vast majority of devices in the world.  SDK version can change.

What’s Left?  Largest piece left is Framework completion.  The other big piece is the Debugger – there are some technical challenges in debugging with the native and JVN code.  

So, no answer to when it will be available.

The Future:  After initial release Auto Layout (used control locking to begin with).  Will eventually support plugins (those built in Xojo) and those can call OS API’s (JVM) and/or include native libraries.  Most of the focus on phones and should work on tablets.

Travis showed us a demo of Android:

Layout Editor looks very much like iOS – except it looks like Android.  Drag and Drop and resizing the Layout Editor looks pretty smooth but nothing that iOS doesn’t already do.

Hitting Run for a simple app didn’t take too long and it opened it in the emulator.

Travis mentioned that even with debugging you have to do Code Signing.

In 2nd example he showed an Android table with some initial values.  Table scrolled properly.    He flipped the phone in the emulator and showed that the control didn’t adjust.  Went back and used the Lock control properties in the inspector and then took it back into emulator to see it in action.

Q & A:  

No container container in list.  Yes, there will be.

Can you write an iOS and Android from same project?  No.  Not today.

Currently it builds 32-bit and 64-bit builds automatically.

Why do plugins need to be in new format?  The plugin format allows you to call the JVM and native libraries.

API 2.0 is changing the offset of strings?  Some confusion on what that will mean.

Using constants in the app, can it be decompiled and be seen?  Important strings should be obfuscated.

BKS WebSplitter 1.0.1

BKeeney Software Releases Version 1.0.1 of WebSplitter for Xojo

BKeeney Software is pleased to announce the release of version 1.0.1 of their WebSplitter for Xojo Web. The WebSplitter control is a browser-side draggable interface splitter for the Xojo Web platform. By leveraging the power of Javascript on the end user’s computer the BKeeney WebSplitter is faster and smoother than a server-side implementation.

This update introduces the ability to nest splitters (like the classic Apple Mail interface) and fixes a few minor bugs!

Version 1.0.1
* Nested splitters and example
* Fixes issues with multiple splitters on one page
* Fixes issue with resizing when stretching with the browser window
* Master container height is no longer calculated and made static
* Splitter color working when using the IDE color picker

A license for WebSplitter is $39.99 and comes with 100% unencrypted Xojo source code.

More information can be found at: http://www.bkeeney.com/allproducts/websplitter-for-xojo/
Purchase now at: http://sites.fastspring.com/bkeeney/product/bkswebsplitter

Berlin Xojo Developer Conference

We are 30 days away from the biggest Xojo developers conference of 2017.  Monkeybread Software is hosting this two-day conference in Berlin, Germany May 4th and 5th.

There are currently 79 attendees from all over the world which is an impressive number.  Let’s make this event even bigger.  Sign up today at http://www.monkeybreadsoftware.de/xojo/events/berlin-2017-event.shtml.

I’ve made no secret of this over the years – I love these events!  It’s a great way to connect with other Xojo developers and talk Xojo and meet all those people you’ve ‘talked to’ on the Xojo forums for years.  I’ve also made first contact with a lot of clients at these events too.  In some cases it’s been the only face-to-face meeting I’ve ever had with them.

Hope to see you in Berlin next month.

Xojo: the Best Secret in the Programming Industry Part 1

Xojo turns twenty years old in 2016.  That’s an extraordinary feat not only for a business but even more as a development tool.  The simple fact is that 90% of all businesses in the United States fail within two years.  There’s a significant number of the remaining businesses that fail two years after that.  Xojo has beaten the odds from a business standpoint.

When it comes to software development tools and languages it seems that every time you turn around there is another programming language of the moment that is the hot, hot, HOT thing that everyone has to learn and then two years later it is relegated to old, has been, technology.  Each one promises to make software development easier and faster and in most cases they solve A problem but not necessarily all problems.  In reality, every development tool still requires a competent programmer to do some work – you get nothing for free.

Xojo has been renamed multiple times first as REALbasic and then as Real Studio but in each name iteration it’s been the same product:  a rapid application development platform and language that creates compiled desktop, console, and web applications native for Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux.  Not only in 32-bit but also for 64-bit.  For a vast majority of users it really is as simple as checking a box captioned “Windows” to create a fully functioning Windows application that works the same as the one you’ve create on the Mac or in Linux.

Xojo started out twenty years ago as CrossBasic before Real Software Inc purchased the rights.  It was modeled after the very successful Microsoft Visual Basic and those roots are still visible today.  Xojo initially ran only on Macintosh but within a few years it ran on Windows.  It now runs on Linux too.

Xojo has transitioned from 68k Macintosh desktop apps, to PowerPC apps, to Carbon apps, and finally to Cocoa apps.  Recently they transitioned from 32-bit applications to 64-bit applications for Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux and introduced Linux ARM as a new target.  This transition is still in progress (the IDE is still 32-bit and remote debugging isn’t available for 64-bit yet) and they’ve announce more transitions on the Windows side to start moving away from the venerable Win32 framework for some things.

Besides desktop apps Xojo also creates console and web apps.  Web apps are a different beast as they expect to keep a constant connection between the browser and application on the server.  This makes web apps work a lot like desktops apps and eliminates a host of typical web app issues.  These web apps can be deployed as either cgi applications or as standalone apps.  The cgi applications work with Apache or IIS servers.  Standalone builds require no server and act as their own server which makes them very easy to deploy to any Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux machine.  Much of the code used in a desktop app is reusable for web apps.

A few years ago Xojo introduced the ability to create iOS applications which introduced yet another target.  iOS transitioned quickly from 32-bit to 64-bit after one of Apples famous ‘deprecations’.  iOS built under Xojo works with the iOS Simulator that comes with Xcode to accomplish remote debugging.  Just a few weeks ago Xojo announced that in late 2017 Android will become another target.

Xojo is an integrated development editor, or IDE, that allows a developer from within one application, to write all the code, layout all the user interface, and include any resources necessary for it to work.  It has a series of built-in editors that mostly mean you’ll never have to leave the Xojo IDE.  Working on desktop, web, console, or iOS projects expose the available libraries and controls for those targets.

Xojo lets you compile final executables or do remote debugging to any of the supported platforms.  So while working on Mac OS X I can remote debug an application in Windows running on another machine on the same network or in a VM environment.  While remote debugging, any exceptions that occur in code are revealed in the IDE and users can view variable values and see the call stack.

These things are nothing spectacular by themselves because many development tools can do them.  What makes Xojo remarkable is that is does this regardless of what platform you develop on.  A Windows developer, Mac OS X developer, and a Linux developer get the same capabilities and can deploy to any of the other platforms.  The only exception is that to do iOS you must be using a Macintosh and have Xcode.

Like any tool it has its detractors but it’s managed to transition, quite quickly at times, due to sudden announcements from Apple (who thought they’d move away from PPC?  Or iOS apps would be 64 bit that quickly?) and from the inevitable changes from Microsoft, and the sometimes daily changes in Linux distributions.  Some users complain about the number of bugs introduced in new releases or that bugs sometimes go years without being fixed.  It’s my opinion, though, that every developer complains about those things in their development tool of choice.  Xojo averages a release every 90 days (with the occasional dot release) and always add some new features and fixes many bugs.

The Xojo community is incredibly welcoming to new people.  There is not a lot of condescension given to new users that ask simple questions on the Xojo forums.  Unlike some other venues there is not a lot of vitriol going on.  The Xojo engineers frequent the forums and answer questions.

Since Xojo has lasted twenty years they’ve already beaten the odds.  There is every indication that they’ll be around many more years.  They are no Apple, Google, or Microsoft, but yet they keep churning out new versions that attempt to keep up with the ever changing development landscape with what many would consider a very lean development staff.  Most of the development staff are former users so there is a high level of familiarity with the needs of the user base.

So why don’t more developers know about Xojo?  With the features and history described above it seems like everyone show know what Xojo can do for them.  That doesn’t seem to be the case so why not?  In part 2 we’ll examine some of those reasons.

2016 Xojo Design Award Winners

img_4508Xojo announced the winners of the 2016 Xojo Design Awards today in Houston, Texas during their annual Xojo Developers Conference (XDC). These are applications and tools made with Xojo that were considered the best in their respective categories.
Best Overall:  EverWeb http://www.everwebapp.com

Best Business App: Light Blue https://www.lightbluesoftware.com

Best Consumer App: Alinof Timer Pro https://www.alinofsoftware.ch/apps/products-timerpro/index.html

Best Cross-Platform App: PubCoder https://www.pubcoder.com

Best iOS App:  Studiometry Touch http://oranged.net/studiometrytouch/

Best Developer Tool:  Everweb http://www.everwebapp.com

These are great examples of what some awesome developers are doing with Xojo. Congratulations!

XDC News:  Android Support

iurThe 2016 Xojo Developer Conference kicked off in Houston, Texas today.  Geoff Perlmann, CEO of Xojo, Inc. took the stage this morning to deliver his keynote speech.  The biggest news of the day is that Android support is coming for Xojo.

Many Xojo developers (myself included) find that iOS support is great but without Android support it’s not complete.  Geoff announced that in the fourth quarter of 2017 Xojo will have the ability to compile Android mobile applications.

This is a big deal and a daunting challenge for this team.  It appears that they’ve done their homework to figure out what they want to do.  Details are scarce at this point but they already know they will compile down to native code and not Java.  They will also use native controls like Xojo does for iOS.

The target version of Android that they are aiming for is JellyBean (version 4.1) or better.  Roughly 97% of all Android users will be covered.  Sadly, version 4.1 was released in 2012 .  I would have thought that 4.4 (KitKat) or better would be a better choice.  Let’s hope that gets changed before release.

Geoff did not mention if Xojo is planning on adding additional staff.  The reason I bring this up is that I find a twelve month timeframe to implement a completely new platform.  A more realistic expectation is that it will be released in beta form and it will be 2018 before it’s ready for more usage.

More details as learn about them.

XDC News:  2017 Roadmap

img_4508In todays keynote address, Geoff Perlmann, CEO of Xojo announced the major features coming to Xojo in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd quarters of 2017.

First quarter:

64-Bit builds will be out of beta.  This means that XojoScript will be 64-bit capable as well.  This also means that 64 bit builds for Windows will include application icons and version info.

Remote Debugging will be available for the Raspberry Pi.  This should make using and developing on the Raspberry Pi that much better.

Remote debugging will also be available for 64 bit!  This should make the transition to 64-bit much faster at this point.  I know that we are holding off moving to 64-bit builds because of the lack of remote debugging.

String and Join functions that are pretty slow in 64 bit builds will now be considerably faster.  Again, really good news for some developers that have experienced this.

Second and Third Quarters:

New projects will be 64-bit by default.  32-bit builds are NOT going away.  What is going away is 32-bit versions of the IDE and while nearly all Mac OS X and Linux OS’s are already 64-bit this might cause some pain for Windows users that will have to update to 64-bit.

The new Xojo framework will come to Console, Web, Desktop and Mobile.  (Technically speaking mobile is already using the new framework.)

New plugin format:  Currently plugins in Xojo are written in C/C++ and are only supported for console, desktop and web application.  Developers will be now be able to create plugins in Xojo that will include resources, windows, etc. that are not possible in the current format.  The advantage of this is that it will allow anyone with a Xojo Pro license to create plugins and could (potentially) dramatically increase the availability of 3rd party controls.

These plugins are compiled into an intermediate format that is not human readable.  Presumably this format is something that can’t be reversed by the average developer.

This new plugin format will become the preferred format but the old style format will be supported for the foreseeable future.  It will be supported for Mac OS X, Windows, Linux, Linux ARM, and for iOS.  This last item is a high want by many Xojo developers.

Fourth Quarter:

Interops is a new feature to take the place of Declares in Xojo.  Declares are great but there’s no autocomplete and there’s absolutely no data type checking.  Interops should make this much easier.

More news coming up!

XDC News: Xojo 2016 Release 4

img_4508In today’s keynote address, Geoff Perlmann, CEO of Xojo announced the major features of Xojo 2016 Release 4.  Release 4 is scheduled to go beta in November and go public in December.

The existing Windows framework drawing is currently done via GDI or GDI+.  Xojo recently dropped Windows XP support and this allowing them to update how Windows apps work.  In the upcoming release Xojo will switch to Direct2D and DirectWrite.

These two technologies will allow better picture scaling and better alpha channel support.  And while GDI+ does have some hardware acceleration these new libraries have full support for hardware acceleration.  In testing, Xojo says that intensive drawing routines should be roughly 280% faster than R3.  End users should only have to recompile their apps to take advantage of this new feature.

Geoff did not talk about flickering but I will attempt to find out more this week.

Among the other changes:

Windows HiDPI will now officially be out of beta.  In addition the Windows Xojo IDE will be released as HiDPI capable.

Xojo Cloud users should see exceptionally better upload speeds.  Starting in R4 the libraries used in the upload are cached so they are not uploaded every single deployment.  This should speed up deployment and testing quite a bit.

More news to follow.

The Power of Meeting Face to Face

In Kansas City this past weekend I attended MidAmerican 2, or WorldCon.  WorldCon is a Science Fiction and Fantasy fans dream come true.  Thousands of people from around the world attended hundreds of sessions covering television shows, movies, author readings and signings, many sessions on how to write, and much more.   It is a long convention at five days that culminates with the Hugo Awards ceremony (think the Academy Awards for science fiction and fantasy).

I am an aspiring science fiction writer (nothing published yet but I’m working on it!).  This convention was an excellent way to immerse myself with professional and amateur writers and learn.  There is something powerful about hearing people that have already “made it”.  Many of them still fight “Imposter Syndrome” and many have issues with the business of writing.  Writing is a solitary business and many are introverts and selling themselves is often nerve wracking.

Do these issues sound familiar?  They should.  In many ways, Xojo developers are much like writers in that they work in a vacuum with little feedback from others.  I know I personally struggle with Imposter Syndrome despite having done this gig for fifteen years and being ‘successful’ (whatever that means).  And much like writing, the only way to get better at Xojo programming is to do Xojo programming.

It seems a bit anachronistic to fly somewhere to meet with people.  After all, the internet makes this easier, right?  There is something powerful about being face-to-face with another person and being able to provide instant feedback.  We also tend to be much more polite in person than online and that’s a huge plus in my opinion.  I’ve met some wonderful people, in person, that online seem rude at best and sometimes simply belligerent.  The internet might make people more accessible but it seems to removal societal filters too, sadly.

In a month and a half Xojo is holding its annual Xojo Developers Conference (XDC) in Houston, Texas.  At XDC, Xojo developers from around the world will join together for three days of sessions covering practically every development topic you can think of.  And if you have a question that’s not covered you’ll be able to find someone to help you.  Besides the many amateurs and professionals attending you’ll have ample opportunities to talk to the Xojo engineers.

It’s not uncommon for businesses looking for a developer to attend XDC.  It gives them the unique opportunity to talk to many Xojo developers in a short amount of time.  We (BKeeney Software) typically speak to one or two prospective clients at XDC each year.  If you’re a consultant this conference should be on your ‘must attend’ list as it can pay for itself many times over if you land just one project.

Today is the last day to save $100 off the conference registration.  Sign up to learn and be inspired and to make some new friends.  See you in Houston!  http://www.xojo.com/store/#conference